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Provision of Train the Trainer (TOT) industrial study tour on Banana Enterprises in Uganda

United Nations Industrial Development Organization | Published September 16, 2015  -  Deadline October 5, 2015
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Provision of Train the Trainer (TOT) industrial study tour on Banana Enterprises in Uganda

Technical Assistance in the Development of the National Industrial Policy for Uganda, 2018-2028

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published July 18, 2017  -  Deadline July 28, 2018
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Industrial development is an integral part of Uganda Government’s vision of transforming the economy from a peasant society to a modern and prosperous society within 30 years. The transformation process is to be hinged on the acceleration of industrialization through upgrading and diversification of the industrial sector to effectively harness local resources, offshoring industries and developing industrial clusters along value chains. The Government also seeks to directly invest in strategic areas to stimulate the economy and facilitate private sector growth.The emphasis on Industrialization is expected to pay dividends through increased employment, more export earnings, widened tax base, increased integration with agriculture, product diversification, and higher productivity throughout the whole economy, among others.The Ministry of Trade, Industry and Cooperatives is mandated to oversee the industrial development process in Uganda and among its core functions is to formulate and review appropriate policies, legislation, regulations and standards for sustainable industrialization.In 2008, Cabinet approved and launched the National Industrialization Policy (NIP) for ten years, with the overall objective of building the industrial sector into a modern, competitive and dynamic sector fully integrated into the domestic, regional and global economies.The current policy stipulates the strategic direction for industrial development in Uganda for the ten years of its implementation and focuses on exploiting and developing natural domestic resource based industries, agro-processing, knowledge-based industries and engineering for capital goods. Now in the 10th and final year of implementing the policy, its key indicators include:25% - contribution of manufactured products to total GDP30% - contribution of manufactured exports to total exports30% - Value added in Industry (as a percentage of GDP4.2 score - Competitiveness IndexObjective of the consultancy:In March, 2017, the Department of Industry and Technology with support from UNIDO embarked on the process of reviewing the existing National Industrial Policy, 2008 to take stock of the achievements, challenges and emerging issues in the last ten years of implementation. The output of the review process will inform the development of the new policy. This process was expected completed in June, 2017.In order to fast-track the development of the new policy, the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Cooperatives seeks the services of a local consultant to provide technical support to an international consultant, under the guidance of a multi sectoral taskforce, in drafting of a new policy and implementation strategy for industrialization.

Technical Expertise in the Development of the National Industrial Policy for Uganda, 2018-2028

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published July 18, 2017  -  Deadline July 28, 2017
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Industrial development is an integral part of Uganda Government’s vision of transforming the economy from a peasant society to a modern and prosperous society within 30 years. The transformation process is to be hinged on the acceleration of industrialization through upgrading and diversification of the industrial sector to effectively harness local resources, offshoring industries and developing industrial clusters along value chains. The Government also seeks to directly invest in strategic areas to stimulate the economy and facilitate private sector growth.The emphasis on Industrialization is expected to pay dividends through increased employment, more export earnings, widened tax base, increased integration with agriculture, product diversification, and higher productivity throughout the whole economy, among others.The Ministry of Trade, Industry and Cooperatives is mandated to oversee the industrial development process in Uganda and among its core functions is to formulate and review appropriate policies, legislation, regulations and standards for sustainable industrialization.In 2008, Cabinet approved and launched the National Industrialization Policy (NIP) for ten years, with the overall objective of building the industrial sector into a modern, competitive and dynamic sector fully integrated into the domestic, regional and global economies.The current policy stipulates the strategic direction for industrial development in Uganda for the ten years of its implementation and focuses on exploiting and developing natural domestic resource based industries, agro-processing, knowledge-based industries and engineering for capital goods. Now in the 10th and final year of implementing the policy, its key indicators include:25% - contribution of manufactured products to total GDP30% - contribution of manufactured exports to total exports30% - Value added in Industry (as a percentage of GDPObjective of the consultancy:In March, 2017, the Department of Industry and Technology with support from UNIDO embarked on the process of reviewing the existing National Industrial Policy, 2008 to take stock of the achievements, challenges and emerging issues in the last ten years of implementation. The output of the review process will inform the development of the new policy. This process was expected completed in June, 2017.In order to fast-track the development of the new policy, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has supported the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Cooperatives to develop a new policy and strategy. The Ministry now seeks services of an international consultant to provide technical expertise, under the guidance of a multi sectoral taskforce, in drafting of a new policy and implementation strategy for industrialization.

Baseline Assessment and Value Chain Analysis of Development Minerals in Uganda

UNDP Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published December 6, 2016  -  Deadline January 6, 2017
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Programme Background The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme is a three-year, €13.1 million capacity building program that aims to build the profile, and improve the management, of Development Minerals (industrial minerals; construction materials; dimension stones; and semi-precious stones. The program is an initiative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States, financed by the European Union and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and implemented by UNDP. The mining of Development Minerals has important implications for sustainable development, however, they have to date received inadequate attention for their potential to impact livelihoods; and few development programmes have provided support for this mining sub-sector. Often referred to as Low Value Minerals and Materials (LVMM) due to their low price as a function of their weight, and their relatively low value to international commodity markets, Development Minerals provide crucial inputs for domestic economic development (infrastructure, manufacturing, construction and agriculture to name a few) and have the potential to be high value in terms of national development. In comparison to the metals sector, Development Minerals have closer links with the local economy, and have the potential to generate more local jobs, with a greater impact on poverty reduction. This is partly because the sector is dominated by small and medium scale domestic businesses. However, there are a number of environmental, social and economic challenges confronting the sector. Development Minerals commonly operate in an uncertain legal and regulatory environment, with a lack of publicly available and easily accessible geological data, which exacerbates wasteful exploration and discourages investment in the sector. The oversight of environmental, social, health and safety issues is often inadequate, and weak or often non-existent technical extension services such as skills training, capacity building, access to technology, finance, appropriate equipment, investment information and markets, has contributed to the sector’s neglect. The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme is being implemented at both the regional and country levels. At the regional level, the programme conducts capacity building activities with participants from forty ACP countries through regional training workshops, field trips, the production of guidance products The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme refers to Development Minerals as minerals and materials that have a high degree of economic linkage close to the location where the commodity is mined, i.e. they are mined for domestic use. Development Minerals include, industrial minerals, construction materials, dimension stones and semi-precious stones.Industrial minerals: substance of economic value, exclusive of metal ores, mineral fuels, and gemstones (e.g. barite, bentonite, borates, calcium carbonate, clays, diatomite, feldspar, granite, gypsum, industrial sand, kaolin, silica, soda ash, talc, wollastonite and zeolite).Construction material (a sub-category of industrial minerals sometimes called ‘industrial rocks’): substances used in the construction of infrastructure, housing and other built structures (e.g. gravel, limestone (cement), construction sand, aggregate, scoria, glass, ceramics, bricks).Dimension stones (a sub-category of industrial minerals and construction materials): rock quarried for the purpose of obtaining blocks or slabs that meet specifications as to size (width, length, and thickness) and shape (e.g. granite, marble, slate, sandstone).Semi-precious stones: a mineral crystal or rock that is generally cut and polished to make jewelry, but that does not include diamond, ruby, emerald and sapphire (precious stones). Examples of semi-precious stones include quartz, amythyst, garnet, aqua-marine, opal and pearl. and knowledge exchange. The programme will also host a final conference to enhance the knowledge sharing activities conducted during the programme. Participants of our regional training workshops implement the skills and knowledge that they have gained from the training through return to work plans. At the country level, in depth capacity building is undertaken with six focus countries: Cameroon (Central Africa); Guinea - Conakry (West Africa); Uganda (East Africa); Zambia (Southern Africa); Jamaica (Caribbean); and Fiji (Pacific). Country-level activities include: training; small grants; the production of maps and databases; development of regulations on environment, health and safety; organization of community dialogues, technology fairs and networking events. Capacity building support is provided in the following thematic areas of importance to the sector: 1) mine and quarry management; 2) environment, health and safety; 3) entrepreneurship skills; 4) market analysis and investment promotion; 5) geo-data and maps design; 6) community relations and addressing grievances. The programme supports a range of key stakeholders in the sector, including public stakeholders such as regulatory agencies and local governments; private stakeholders such as small-scale mining enterprises, intermediaries, transportation and logistics service providers, construction companies; business development stakeholders such as mining and quarrying associations, chambers of mines, training centres, universities, consulting companies; and social stakeholders such as civil society organizations and community groups. The aim of the capacity building activities are to:Enhance employment and incomes, including employment and incomes of womenImprove the policy and regulatory environmentMinimize environmental impacts on communitiesAddress individual and community rights and preventing conflictEnsure decent working conditionsFacilitate South-South cooperation and cross-country learning

International/National Consultant to support delivery of 4 Regional Training Workshops on Environment, Community, Health and Safety in the Development Minerals sector

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 9, 2017  -  Deadline March 24, 2017
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The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme is a three-year, €13.1 million capacity building program that aims to build the profile, and improve the management, of Development Minerals (industrial minerals; construction materials; dimension stones; and semi-precious stones). The program is an initiative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States, financed by the European Union and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and implemented by UNDP.The mining of Development Minerals has important implications for sustainable development, however, they have to date received inadequate attention for their potential to impact livelihoods; and few development programmes have provided support for this mining sub-sector. Often referred to as Low Value Minerals and Materials (LVMM) due to their low price as a function of their weight, and their relatively low value to international commodity markets, Development Minerals provide crucial inputs for domestic economic development (infrastructure, manufacturing, construction and agriculture to name a few) and have the potential to be high value in terms of national development. In comparison to the metals sector, Development Minerals have closer links with the local economy, and have the potential to generate more local jobs, with a greater impact on poverty reduction. This is partly because the sector is dominated by small and medium scale domestic businesses. However, the income generation potential of the sector often remains unrealized or under-realized. This is in part due to the uncertain legal and regulatory framework in which the sector operates and the lack of publicly available and easily accessible geological data, which exacerbates wasteful exploration and discourages investment in the sector. Furthermore, there can be significant social and environmental impacts associated with the mining of Development Minerals, with consequences on health and safety of workers in this sector and surrounding communities.The ACP-EU Development Minerals programme is implemented at the regional level (with participants from forty countries) and at the country level (focus countries include: Cameroon, Central Africa; Guinea – Conakry, West Africa; Uganda, East Africa; Zambia, Southern Africa; Jamaica, Caribbean; and Fiji, Pacific). At the regional level, the programme will conduct training activities. At the country level, it will include both training and other activities, such as small grants and partnerships to produce maps and databases on low-value minerals, development of regulations on environment and safety, organizing community engagement, addressing grievances, organizations of technology fairs and networking events, organization of public-private dialogues etc. The thematic areas of the programme activities are: 1) mine and quarry management; 2) environment, health and safety; 3) entrepreneurship skills; 4) market analysis and investment promotion; 5) geo-data and maps design; 6) community relations and addressing grievances.The project uses UNDP’s capacity development approach. The key stakeholders will include public stakeholders such as regulatory agencies and local governments; private stakeholders such as small-scale mining enterprises and associations, business development centers; and social stakeholders such as civil society organizations and community groups.

Addressing Barriers to Adoption of Improved Charcoal Production Technologies and Sustainable Land Practices through an Integrated Approach – Green Charcoal Project

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published January 5, 2017  -  Deadline April 13, 2017
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Uganda’s energy sector is characterized by over 90% of the population relying on use of biomass, with wood fuel being the main source of heating and cooking in rural and urban areas (GIZ, 2011).Firewood and charcoal contribute 88% and 6% respectively to the country’s total energy consumption.At present 18% of the population in Uganda depend on charcoal for cooking (MEMD 2014). A close relationship exists between the growth of charcoal consumption and urbanization. Of the total charcoal produced 23% is consumed by commercial establishments and 67% is consumed by the households. The potential to use charcoal in industrial establishments has not been explored fully in Uganda but preliminary studies have suggested that the potential exists.The recommended level of national forest cover for Uganda to have a stable ecological system is 30 per cent. The national forest cover as of 2005 was at 18 per cent, having dropped from 24 per cent in 1990. This decline which is estimated at 1.8 per cent per annum is largely attributed to increasing demand for agricultural land and fuel wood by the rapidly growing population. Between 1990 and 2005 alone, a total of 1,329,570ha (27 per cent of original forest cover) was lost. Recent spatial analyses (2010 images) indicate that the current forest cover is now 10per cent and major loss is found on private lands due to unsustainable extraction of forests for charcoal and fuel wood production, timber and agricultural expansion.Since forestry sector reform that took place between 1998 and 2004, there has been no deliberate effort to guide systematic production and trade in charcoal. Key institutions involved in administration and management of the harvesting, production and trade along the value chain have been poorly coordinated and as a result, there has been un harmonized implementation of their operations. Although, the forestry law (NFTPA, 2003) recognizes charcoal as one of the forestry products that is regulated in the same manner like other products, there is evidence that charcoal trade has many unique attributes that require further guidance that will be elaborated through the national guidelines. The guidelines will enhance sustainable production, handling, transportation and trade, therefore, improve efficiency of the actors and formalize the various processes and activities along the value chain.Objectives of the assignment:The main objective of this assignment is to develop national guidelines for sustainable production, transportation and trade in charcoal in Uganda. Specifically the consultant will:Identify stakeholders and institutions involved in administration and management of various aspects of the trade along the entire value chain;Review relevant policies and laws that govern production of and trade in charcoal;Identify gaps, weaknesses, opportunities and strengths that need to be address for effective regulation and efficiency in the trade along the entire value chain;Conduct stakeholder consultations to come up with draft and final guidelines on Sustainable production and trade in charcoal.

Request for Applications: Uganda Country Training Workshops on Environment, Community, Health & Safety in the Development Minerals Sector

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 6, 2017  -  Deadline March 20, 2017
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REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONSUganda Country Training Workshops on Environment, Community, Health & Safety in the Development Minerals Sector ACP-EU Development Minerals ProgrammeBackground:The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme is a three-year, €13.1 million capacity building program that aims to build the profile, and improve the management, of Development Minerals (industrial minerals; construction materials; dimension stones; and semi-precious stones). The program is an initiative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States, financed by the European Union and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and implemented by UNDP.The mining of Development Minerals has important implications for sustainable development, however, they have to date received inadequate attention for their potential to impact livelihoods; and few development Programmes have provided support for this mining sub-sector. Development Minerals provide crucial inputs for domestic economic development (infrastructure, manufacturing, construction and agriculture to name a few) and have the potential to be high value in terms of national development. In comparison to the metals sector, Development Minerals have closer links with the local economy, and have the potential to generate more local jobs, with a greater impact on poverty reduction. This is partly because the sector is dominated by small and medium scale domestic businesses. However, the income generation potential of the sector often remains unrealized or under-realized. This is in part due to the uncertain legal and regulatory framework in which the sector operates and the lack of publicly available and easily accessible geological data, which exacerbates wasteful exploration and discourages investment in the sector. Furthermore, there can be significant social and environmental impacts associated with the mining of Development Minerals, with consequences on health and safety of workers in this sector and surrounding communities. The programme is making contribution to addressing these challenges through targeted capacity support to mining sector stakeholders towards robust environmental, health & safety practices; improved mining and quarry management and effective conflict resolution and community relations.The Programme, in partnership with the Ministry of Energy and Minerals Development, is conducting 5-day country-level training workshops in the various regions of Uganda in the thematic areas of Environment, Community and Health and Safety. The workshops will be hosted in Mbale, Entebbe, Gulu and Mbarara districts and will be attended by approximately forty participants in each the four districts. The training workshops have the following objectives:Increase the awareness of environment, community, and health and safety issues and challengesFacilitate south-south knowledge exchange on the practices and governance arrangements necessary for the sector to contribute to inclusive and sustainable developmentBuild the capacity of individual stakeholders through participation in the training workshop and the preparation of return-to-work plansUNDP is now accepting expressions of interest to participate in the training programmes that cover these thematic areas. The training participants will include public stakeholders such as regulatory agencies and local governments, private sector stakeholders such as small-scale mining enterprises, associations, business development stakeholders including universities and civil society stakeholders and community groups from Uganda. Applicants must demonstrate an interest and experience in working in Uganda’s Mining sector, be based in the four regions covered in the aforementioned districts and be willing to prepare and implement Return to Work Plans. Each applicant is requested to write a cover letter justifying their eligibility for selection for training and fill in the Request for Applications form appended on this document.Please note that incomplete applications will not be accepted.

National Consultant to prepare NDCs Implementation Plan

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 17, 2017  -  Deadline August 31, 2017
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In 2015 the world endorsed an ambitious agenda for Sustainable Development and a landmark agreement to avert run away climate change. Attention now turns to implementing the unprecedented global commitments encompassed by the Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement and ultimately the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).At the heart of the Paris Agreement (PA) is the mitigation target; limiting global temperature rise well below 2 degrees Celsius, while making every effort to realize the 1.5 degrees, leading to net zero emissions in the second half of the century; Establish binding commitments and urged all parties to submit Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), and to pursue domestic measures aimed at achieving them; Commit all countries to report regularly on their emissions and “progress made in implementing and achieving” their NDCs, and to undergo international review; Commit all countries to submit new NDCs every five years, with the clear expectation that they will “represent a progression” beyond previous ones - hence the need to strengthen NDC governance and implementation structure; Reaffirm the binding obligations of developed countries under the UNFCCC to support the efforts of developing countries, while for the first time encouraging voluntary contributions by developing countries too; Extend the current goal of mobilizing $100 billion a year in support by 2020 through 2025, with a new, higher goal to be set for the period after 2025;Particularly Uganda NDCs prioritize: Renewable Energy, Clean Cooking- Which holds great mitigation potential for Uganda due to the potential offsetting of wood and charcoal burning and the consequential deforestation, climate smart agriculture, forestry and land restoration (including wetlands) and the transport sector with a focus on adaptation and resilience of local communities to climate change impacts.On energy, the NDC Uganda points to Uganda’s commitment to achieve a total of at least 3,200 MW renewable electricity generation capacity by 2030 up from 729 MW in 2013. In terms of energy demand the NDC explicitly proposes the promotion and wider uptake of energy efficient cooking stoves and induction cookers that we see contributing to approximately 40% efficiency saving over traditional cooking stoves. Similarly, for transport Uganda NDC proffers implementation of fuel efficiency policies and regulations to promote cleaner fuels and more fuel-efficient vehicle technology contributing to GHGs reduction between 24% and 34% of BAU projections for road transport.Focus now turns to implementation of these actions with the understanding that implementing the NDCs offers significant benefits, such as greater energy security and improved resilience to energy price shocks, improved health due to lower conventional pollutant emissions, and greater agricultural and land -use productivity with a clear opportunity to advance to new cleaner technologies such as wind and solar energy, low energy buildings, energy efficient industrial production, sustainable transport and climate smart agriculture.Despite all this effort, transiting and actual implementation of the commitments largely remains a challenge due to capacity gaps that exit. One of the key bottlenecks is are policy gaps related to implementation as well as an NDC implementation plan which is central to Uganda’s efforts to successfully tackle climate change. This includes designing and implementation plan as well as identifying the necessary resources available to support the actions both nationally and internationally, timelines of activities with robust outputs to facilitate the national and international reporting requirements/obligations.Against that background the Government of Uganda with support from UNDP is seeking to ensure a robust plan is in place to support implementation of the NDCs and the PA in order to achieve the ultimate goal of limiting global temperature increase well below 2 degrees.

National Consultant to prepare Communication Materials

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 17, 2017  -  Deadline August 31, 2017
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The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) sets an overall framework for intergovernmental efforts to tackle the challenge posed by climate change. It recognizes that the climate system is a shared resource whose stability can be affected by industrial and other emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.Under the UNFCCC, governments gather and share information on national policies and best practices, greenhouse gas emissions; launch national strategies for addressing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to expected impacts, including the provision of financial and technological support to developing countries; cooperate in preparing for adaptation to the impacts of climate changeAction for climate change education (ACE) of the Convention seeks to promote action at the national and local level to provide the education, training and public awareness needed to understand and deal with climate change impacts.Moving forward the Government of Uganda ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC and its Kyoto Protocol in 1993 and 2002 respectively.In response to its commitments under the Convention and decisions of the Conference of the Parties, Uganda has made considerable effort taken big and bold steps towards the implementation of the Convention by:Signing and Ratifying the Paris AgreementSubmitted and supports implementation of the Nationally Determined ContributionsPreparation and submission of its the National Communication, which identify sources of greenhouse gases and corresponding mitigations, vulnerable sectors and adaptation options and measures to be taken given financial support;Preparation of National Adaptation Programmes of Action, (NAPA) which identified immediate and urgent adaptation actions at community level to minimize vulnerability of communities. Embarked on the NAPs development.Given the high vulnerability of rural communities in Uganda, appropriate communication of adaptation strategies across all sectors is of utmost importance. Food security for instance relies to a large extent on rain fed and subsistence agriculture. This implies that food production and farming systems will have to cope with the changing climate patterns, such as increased droughts, floods, serious changes in precipitation cycles, affecting planting calendars and crop choices. In addition to water scarcity and increased climate variability, natural resources such as soil and plants will need to be more carefully managed taking climate risks into account.In this regard, therefore public awareness, exchange of information and communication are important components that are crosscutting to the entirety of attempts undertaken by Uganda to implement the UNFCCC, Kyoto Protocol and he Paris Agreement. To that end there is therefore need to assess the level of awareness and design communication materials that respond to those needs identified. Due to the complexity of the climate change dilemma its critical that the climate change messages are communicated successfully considering many different groups including local communities, partners in implementation both state and non-state, opinion leaders/formers, and other key stakeholders.The purpose of the assignment therefore is to develop a more systematic, effective and harmonized approach towards supporting NDC implementation, through communication and outreach on climate change and dissemination to promote public - private actor’s participation while taking into consideration the needs of the vulnerable groups, mechanisms of communication, heterogeneity of Ugandan population and various levels of education amongst information users.

RFP Procurement of a firm to deliver four 5-day country wide training workshops on Enterprise skills, Investment promotion and Market analysis in the development Minerals Sector.

UNDP Uganda- UGANDA - UGANDA | Published August 16, 2017  -  Deadline September 15, 2017
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Overview:The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme is a three-year, €13.1 million capacity building program that aims to build the profile, and improve the management, of Development Minerals (industrial minerals; construction materials; dimension stones; and semi-precious stones). The­­ program is an initiative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States, financed by the European Union and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and implemented by UNDP.The mining of Development Minerals has important implications for sustainable development, however, they have to date received inadequate attention for their potential to impact livelihoods; and few development programmes have provided support for this mining sub-sector. Often referred to as Low Value Minerals and Materials (LVMM) due to their low price as a function of their weight, and their relatively low value to international commodity markets, Development Minerals provide crucial inputs for domestic economic development (infrastructure, manufacturing, construction and agriculture to name a few) and have the potential to be high value in terms of national development. In comparison to the metals sector, Development Minerals have closer links with the local economy, and have the potential to generate more local jobs, with a greater impact on poverty reduction. This is partly because the sector is dominated by small and medium scale domestic businesses. However, the income generation potential of the sector often remains unrealized or under-realized. This is in part due to the uncertain legal and regulatory framework in which the sector operates and the lack of publicly available and easily accessible geological data, which exacerbates wasteful exploration and discourages investment in the sector. Furthermore, there can be significant social and environmental impacts associated with the mining of Development Minerals, with consequences on health and safety of workers in this sector and surrounding communities.The Development Minerals sub-sector faces numerous challenges, including; i) lack of access to markets due to low production volumes that make it costly for market off-takers to directly buy from the miners; ii) low productivity due to poor and rudimentary mining practices, and inadequate access to extension services; iii) lack of access to productive assets such as technology, finance and market information; iv) weak value and market chain linkages (inputs, production, distribution, processing, and marketing etc.); v) poor physical, market and institutional infrastructure; vi) inadequate skills in undertaking mineral and material extraction as a business; as well as vii) weak and sometimes uncoordinated policy, legal and regulatory frameworks.The ACP-EU Development Minerals programme in Uganda the project utilizes UNDP’s capacity development approach and key stakeholders include public stakeholders such as regulatory agencies and local governments; private stakeholders such as small-scale mining enterprises and associations, business development centers; and social stakeholders such as civil society organizations and community groups.UNDP Uganda kindly requests the submission of proposals for \"RFP Procurement of a firm to deliver four 5-day country wide training workshops on Enterprise skills, Investment promotion and Market analysis in the development Minerals Sector\"as per the detailed requirements of this RFP (attached as PDF document). When preparing your proposal, please be guided by the form attached hereto as Annex 2 of which a Microsoft Word copy is attached for you convenience.Proposals may be submitted on or before 15 September 2017 at 04.00 pm by following the submission instructions detailed in the solicitation document (RFP).

Lead Consultant for Urban Public Space and Land Management for Equitable Growth in Uganda

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 7, 2017  -  Deadline August 17, 2017
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The United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) is a UN organization with a capital mandate (unique in the UN System) focused on reducing poverty and inequality first and foremost in the least developed countries (“LDC”s). UNCDF develops and tests out financial models which mobilize and recycle domestic resources to meet local needs and which raise investor confidence in these local economies so that they can become centres of growth. UNCDF works with local governments, promoting financial and fiscal accountability to its citizens through local development funds, performance-based grant systems, structured project finance, and by strengthening local revenue streams. It also supports accountable planning, budgeting, and decision-making at the local level, recognizing the importance of having decisions about resources being made locally, and those resources being spent or invested locally.UNCDF in partnership with the Cities Alliance, the global partnership for poverty reduction and the promotion of cities in sustainable development with a representative global membership of over 30 full and associate members is implementing the Joint Work Proramme on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities in Uganda. The JWP on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities (2016-2020) focuses on supporting equitable access to public goods and services by all citizens and formal and informal businesses in cities. It works with development partners to produce global knowledge, facilitate policy dialogues and support city-level diagnostics and policy recommendations. The goal is to support growth trajectories increasingly characterised by equity, inclusion and environmental sustainability.UNCDF is specifically responsible for implementation of JWP Component 3: The Campaign Cities Initiative. The main objective is to assist two municipal governments in Uganda, the municipalities of Gulu and Mbale, to develop well-researched and evidence-based policy recommendations on how to improve the delivery of municipal public goods and service that contribute to equitable economic growth. Also, the project will facilitate UNCDF and other JWP members to support the promotion of equitable access to public goods and services in the selected Ugandan cities, based on local needs, capacities and priorities.During a 24-month local support initiative, the two Ugandan municipalities will be assisted in producing a number of outputs, such as an Institutional Enabling Environment Report, a Local Assessment Report, and city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations. Two themes were identified through a participatory and consultative process for Local Assessment Reports in Gulu and Mbale – Public Space and Land Management, and Local Economic Development. Local Assessment Reports are intended to provide detailed information about a particular public service, its scope, delivery mechanisms and recommendations about service improvements required to promote equitable economic growth. A Local Assessment Report contains a situation analysis and mapping of the city economy in terms of factors, systems and structures related to the provision of and access to public goods, resulting in a clearly documented evidence base. It is the key input to inform city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations to specify policy, legal and regulatory actions to be employed by municipal authorities to implement the LAR recommendations.Objectives of the Consultancy:For the process of urbanization to take place rapidly and efficiently, proper land use is critically important to ensuring that these areas drive growth in productivity and productive employment. The economic benefits of urban growth come from exploiting economies of scale; from agglomeration effects; and from effective substitution between land and non-land inputs. One of the most important pillars of an efficient city is appropriate land use, which in turn is determined by land policies and institutions that support urban efficiency. Increasing the density of economic activities is one of the key features of successful urbanization, enabled by using land for higher value activities over time.As Ugandan towns strive to foster equitable and inclusive economic growth, the challenges of ensuring proper public space and land management become more pronounced. Effective urban land management is required to promote urban regeneration and development of new industrial and commercial districts, investments to upgrade and expand critical infrastructure systems, programs to enhance and protect the environment, and initiatives to upgrade social overhead capital (housing, education, healthcare). Inadequate urban land management is a key challenge to the private sector’s engagement with developing the town by providing businesses and residents with shops, offices, factories and housing. Municipal governments, with their democratic mandate, play a triple role with respect to effective urban land management:as regulators in charge of the open space and land management framework at the local level through development plans, physical and land use plans, zoning regulations by-laws and ordinances; the regulatory function also includes enforcement of the applicable regulations;as users of land under their direct administration, including open space, directly responsible for effective use and maintenance of land and associated natural resources including land acquisition, rent or sale to third parties;as developers implementing, directly or in partnership with third parties, land development projects including changing landforms for a purpose such as housing or industrial development; subdivision of real estate into lots as well as real estate development.The New Urban Development Agenda (2016) stresses the need to take advantage of the opportunities of urbanization as an engine of sustained and inclusive economic growth, social and cultural development, and environmental protection, and of its potential contributions to the achievement of transformative and sustainable development. Specifically, it calls for the development of urban spatial frameworks that support sustainable management and use of natural resources and land, appropriate compactness and density, polycentrism, and mixed uses, through infill or planned urban extension strategies as applicable, to trigger economies of scale and agglomeration, strengthen food system planning, enhance resource efficiency, urban resilience, and environmental sustainability. The New Urban Agenda explicitly promotes safe, inclusive, accessible, green, and quality public spaces as drivers of social and economic development, sustainably leveraging their potential to generate increased social and economic value, including property value, and to facilitate business, public and private investments, and livelihood opportunities for all.Hence, UNCDF seeks to engage a Lead Consultant to prepare a Local Assessment Report on Public Space and Land Management in Gulu and Mbale and perform other relevant activities associated with this output. The objective of the LAR is to establish a reliable evidence base with respect to the public space and land management in the target municipalities from the perspective of public service delivery that fosters equitable economic growth.

Consultant for Urban Public Space and Land Management for Equitable Growth in Uganda

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 7, 2017  -  Deadline August 17, 2017
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The United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) is a UN organization with a capital mandate (unique in the UN System) focused on reducing poverty and inequality first and foremost in the least developed countries (“LDC”s). UNCDF develops and tests out financial models which mobilize and recycle domestic resources to meet local needs and which raise investor confidence in these local economies so that they can become centres of growth. UNCDF works with local governments, promoting financial and fiscal accountability to its citizens through local development funds, performance-based grant systems, structured project finance, and by strengthening local revenue streams. It also supports accountable planning, budgeting, and decision-making at the local level, recognizing the importance of having decisions about resources being made locally, and those resources being spent or invested locally.UNCDF in partnership with the Cities Alliance, the global partnership for poverty reduction and the promotion of cities in sustainable development with a representative global membership of over 30 full and associate members is implementing the Joint Work Proramme on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities in Uganda. The JWP on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities (2016-2020) focuses on supporting equitable access to public goods and services by all citizens and formal and informal businesses in cities. It works with development partners to produce global knowledge, facilitate policy dialogues and support city-level diagnostics and policy recommendations. The goal is to support growth trajectories increasingly characterised by equity, inclusion and environmental sustainability.UNCDF is specifically responsible for implementation of JWP Component 3: The Campaign Cities Initiative. The main objective is to assist two municipal governments in Uganda, the municipalities of Gulu and Mbale, to develop well-researched and evidence-based policy recommendations on how to improve the delivery of municipal public goods and service that contribute to equitable economic growth. Also, the project will facilitate UNCDF and other JWP members to support the promotion of equitable access to public goods and services in the selected Ugandan cities, based on local needs, capacities and priorities.During a 24-month local support initiative, the two Ugandan municipalities will be assisted in producing a number of outputs, such as an Institutional Enabling Environment Report, a Local Assessment Report, and city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations. Two themes were identified through a participatory and consultative process for Local Assessment Reports in Gulu and Mbale – Public Space and Land Management, and Local Economic Development. Local Assessment Reports are intended to provide detailed information about a particular public service, its scope, delivery mechanisms and recommendations about service improvements required to promote equitable economic growth. A Local Assessment Report contains a situation analysis and mapping of the city economy in terms of factors, systems and structures related to the provision of and access to public goods, resulting in a clearly documented evidence base. It is the key input to inform city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations to specify policy, legal and regulatory actions to be employed by municipal authorities to implement the LAR recommendations.Objectives of the Consultancy:For the process of urbanization to take place rapidly and efficiently, proper land use is critically important to ensuring that these areas drive growth in productivity and productive employment. The economic benefits of urban growth come from exploiting economies of scale; from agglomeration effects; and from effective substitution between land and non-land inputs. One of the most important pillars of an efficient city is appropriate land use, which in turn is determined by land policies and institutions that support urban efficiency. Increasing the density of economic activities is one of the key features of successful urbanization, enabled by using land for higher value activities over time.As Ugandan towns strive to foster equitable and inclusive economic growth, the challenges of ensuring proper public space and land management become more pronounced. Effective urban land management is required to promote urban regeneration and development of new industrial and commercial districts, investments to upgrade and expand critical infrastructure systems, programs to enhance and protect the environment, and initiatives to upgrade social overhead capital (housing, education, healthcare). Inadequate urban land management is a key challenge to the private sector’s engagement with developing the town by providing businesses and residents with shops, offices, factories and housing. Municipal governments, with their democratic mandate, play a triple role with respect to effective urban land management:as regulators in charge of the open space and land management framework at the local level through development plans, physical and land use plans, zoning regulations by-laws and ordinances; the regulatory function also includes enforcement of the applicable regulations;as users of land under their direct administration, including open space, directly responsible for effective use and maintenance of land and associated natural resources including land acquisition, rent or sale to third parties;as developers implementing, directly or in partnership with third parties, land development projects including changing landforms for a purpose such as housing or industrial development; subdivision of real estate into lots as well as real estate development.The New Urban Development Agenda (2016) stresses the need to take advantage of the opportunities of urbanization as an engine of sustained and inclusive economic growth, social and cultural development, and environmental protection, and of its potential contributions to the achievement of transformative and sustainable development. Specifically, it calls for the development of urban spatial frameworks that support sustainable management and use of natural resources and land, appropriate compactness and density, polycentrism, and mixed uses, through infill or planned urban extension strategies as applicable, to trigger economies of scale and agglomeration, strengthen food system planning, enhance resource efficiency, urban resilience, and environmental sustainability. The New Urban Agenda explicitly promotes safe, inclusive, accessible, green, and quality public spaces as drivers of social and economic development, sustainably leveraging their potential to generate increased social and economic value, including property value, and to facilitate business, public and private investments, and livelihood opportunities for all. Hence, UNCDF seeks to engage a Consultant to prepare a Local Assessment Report on Public Space and Land Management in Gulu and Mbale and perform other relevant activities associated with this output. The objective of the LAR is to establish a reliable evidence base with respect to the public space and land management in the target municipalities from the perspective of public service delivery that fosters equitable economic growth.

Uganda - Information Notice - Proposed Construction of Faculty of Business Computing Building at Makerere University Business School - Contract Awards – 06 2015

 | Published June 29, 2015
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PUBLICATION OF AWARD OF CONTRACT FOR GOODS & WORKS INFORMATION NOTICE Country: Uganda Executing Agency: Ministry of Education, Sceince, Technology and Sports, P.O. Box 7063 Kampala Name of Project: Higher Education Science and Technology (HEST Education V) Project Loan/Grant Number: 2100150028093 Name of Tender: Proposed Construction of Faculty of Business Computing Building at Makerere University Business School Lot Number & Name (If different from Tender): Lot 9: Procurement mode: International Competitive Bidding (ICB) Domestic preference (Yes or No): No Regional preference (Yes or No): No Borrower’s Tender Number: MoES/ HEST/WRKS/2014-15 / PR00126/C0888 Date of receipt by the Bank of the draft Tender document: 30th November 2014 Date of approval by the Bank of the Tender Document: 15th December 2014 Tender issuing date: 17th December 2014 Closing date of the Tender: 27th February 2015 Date of Tender opening: 27th February 2015 Date of receipt by the Bank of the Tender evaluation report: 24th March 2015 Date of approval by the Bank of the Tender evaluation: 16th April 2015 Name of the winning Bidder: AMBITIOUS CONSTRUCTION LTD Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot 1, Swaminarayan Close, Wankulukuku Rd, Nalukolongo Industrial Area, P . O. Box 12452 Kampala, Uganda Contract Award Price: USD 2,262,702.55 (Tax Inclusive) Contract Duration: 12 months Summary of Scope of Contract Awarded: Proposed Construction of Faculty of Business Computing Building at Makerere University Business School Total Number of Bidders: Twenty (21) 1. For each Bidder: Name: ARAB CONTRACTORS LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: P O Box 7289, Kampala Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,482,309.24 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 2. For each Bidder: Name: WEHAI INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC AND TECHNICAL CORPORATION Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot 7/9 Clement Hill Road, Kampala Bid Price as Read-out: USD 3,395,791.95 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 3. For each Bidder: Name: SEYANI BROTHERS & COMPANY (U) LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: 3rd Floor, Conrad Plaza Ggaba Road, P.O. Box 21745, Kampala, Uganda Bid Price as Read-out: USD 3,371,655.25 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: USD 2,450,567.33 (Tax Inclusive) Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Bid price higher than the lowest evaluated bidder 4. For each Bidder: Name: HENLEY PROPERTIES DEVELOPERS LTD & BEIJING UNI CONSTRUCTION GROUP COMPANY LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: P. O Box 9396 Kampala Picfare House 2nd Floor, Plot 37, Jinja Road Bid Price as Read-out: USD 4,154,974.00 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 5. For each Bidder: Name: ` HL INVESTMENTS LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot M471 Nakawa Industrial Area, P.O. Box 9419 Kampala, Uganda Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,097,900.00 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 6. For each Bidder: Name: OCTAGON LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot 1376, 214 Kisasi, P. O. Box 36142, Kampala, Uganda Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,707,689.22 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 7. For each Bidder: Name: SARAJAN CONSTRUCTION CO LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot 19, Mackenzie Vale, Kololo, P O Box 24498 Kampala, Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,218,300.39 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 8. For each Bidder: Name: HANSOL E & C COOPERATION LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: P. O. Box 256444 Kampala Bid Price as Read-out: USD 3,632,319.00 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the preliminary evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 9. For each Bidder: Name: CRJE (EA) LIMITED Nationality: Tanzania Address: P O Box 77198, Dar- er- salaam Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,387,450.79 (Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: USD 2,387,245.32 ( Tax Inclusive) Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Bid price higher than the lowest evaluated bidder 10. For each Bidder: Name: CHINA NEW ERA GROUP CORP. EA LIMITED Nationality: China Address: No 2 Ping Anli West Road, Xicheng District, Beijing, P R China, Postal code 100034 Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,648,345 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: USD 2,594,465.16 ( Tax Inclusive) Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Bid price higher than the lowest evaluated bidder 11. For each Bidder: Name: CHINA NATIONAL AERO TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL ENGINEERING CORPORATION Nationality: Uganda Address: P O Box 20508, Kampala Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,780,000.98 ( Tax Exclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 12. For each Bidder: Name: COIL LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot 212, Block 4 Rubaga Rd, Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,107,779.00 ( Tax Exclusive) Evaluated Price: USD 2,312,571.20 ( Tax Exclusive) Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Bid price higher than the lowest evaluated bidder 13. For each Bidder: Name: ZHONGNAN CONSTRUCTION CO. (U) L LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: P O Box 6025, Kampala Bid Price as Read-out: USD 5,725,116.00 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 14. For each Bidder: Name: EXCEL CONSTRUCTION LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot 43/45 Engineer Zikusoka Road P.O. Box 1202, Jinja Queen Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,572,236.22 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: USD 2,572,464.98 ( Tax Inclusive) Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Bid price higher than the lowest evaluated bidder 15. For each Bidder: Name: BMK (U) LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: P O Box 5234, Kampala Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,590,739.00 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 16. For each Bidder: Name: CHINA NANJING INTERNATIONAL LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot M 451, Banka P O Box 2698, Kampala Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,385,030.00 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 17. For each Bidder: Name: PEARL ENGINEERING CO. LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot 816 / P.O. Box 7553, Kampala Nsambya Estate Rd, Kampala, Uganda Bid Price as Read-out: USD 3,105,061.43 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: USD 3,121,654.57 ( Tax Inclusive) Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Bid price higher than the lowest evaluated bidder 18. For each Bidder: Name: YANJIAN GROUP CO. L LIMITED Nationality: China Address: 100 Nanhong St Yantai City China, Postal Code/ 264000 , Bid Price as Read-out: USD 3,105,061.43 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 19. For each Bidder: Name: HYA CHANG INFRASTRUCTURE ENG. LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: Plot No 54, Princess Anne Drive Bugolobi Bid Price as Read-out: USD 1,989,968.56 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document 20. For each Bidder: Name: TECHNO THREE (U) LIMITED Nationality: Uganda Address: P O Box 37429, Kampala Uganda Bid Price as Read-out: USD 2,2,378,515.06 ( Tax Inclusive) Evaluated Price: Price evaluation not carried out Bid Accepted / Rejected: Rejected Reason for Rejection: Did not meet the technical evaluation criteria indicated in the solicitation document.

Request for Applications for Uganda Country Training Workshops on Enterprise Skills, Investment Promotion, and Market Analysis

UNDP Uganda- UGANDA - UGANDA | Published August 15, 2017  -  Deadline September 15, 2017
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REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS Uganda Country Training Workshops on Enterprise Skills, Investment Promotion, and Market Analysis ACP-EU Development Minerals ProgrammeBackground:The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme is a three-year, €13.1 million capacity building program that aims to build the profile, and improve the management, of Development Minerals (industrial minerals; construction materials; dimension stones; and semi-precious stones). The program is an initiative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States, financed by the European Union and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and implemented by UNDP.The mining of Development Minerals has important implications for sustainable development, however, they have to date received inadequate attention for their potential to impact livelihoods; and few development Programmes have provided support for this mining sub-sector. Development Minerals provide crucial inputs for domestic economic development (infrastructure, manufacturing, construction and agriculture to name a few) and have the potential to be high value in terms of national development. In comparison to the metals sector, Development Minerals have closer links with the local economy, and have the potential to generate more local jobs, with a greater impact on poverty reduction. This is partly because the sector is dominated by small and medium scale domestic businesses. However, the income generation potential of the sector often remains unrealized or under-realized. This is in part due to the uncertain legal and regulatory framework in which the sector operates and the lack of publicly available and easily accessible geological data, which exacerbates wasteful exploration and discourages investment in the sector.The mining of Development Minerals has important implications for sustainable development, however, they have not to date received adequate attention for their potential to impact livelihoods and few development programmes have provided support for this mining sub-sector. The Programme is making contribution to addressing these challenges through targeted capacity support to mining sector stakeholders towards strengthening the capacity of programme stakeholders to increase the sector’s productivity.UNDP, in partnership with the Ministry of Energy and Minerals Development, is conducting 5-day country-level training workshops in the thematic areas of Enterprise Skills, Investment Promotion and Market analysis in the Development Minerals Sector. The training workshops have the following objectives:To enhance enterprise development and management skills enabling existing and potential (formal and informal) small and medium-sized entrepreneurs, including women and youth, to start viable businesses, strengthen the viability and profitability of existing enterprises and create employment in the process;To increase understanding of the dynamics of the targeted value chains and identification of the opportunities and constraints along specific value chains;To develop the market analysis and investment promotion skills of small and medium-size enterprises;To enhance the capacity of business development services (BDS) to facilitate business start-ups and scale-ups by delivering sector-specific training, extension services and support for existing and potential entrepreneurs in business plan development, market analysis and investment promotion;To facilitate in-country knowledge exchange on low-tech, low-cost and environmentally friendly value addition techniques for targeted minerals for the sector to contribute to inclusive and sustainable development.UNDP is now accepting expressions of interest to participate in the training programmes that cover these thematic areas. The training participants will include:a) Private stakeholders such as small-scale mining and quarrying enterprises, intermediaries, transportation and logistics service providers, construction companies;b) Business development stakeholders such as Mining and quarrying associations (including women’s mining associations); chambers of mines; training centres; universities and research institutions, and consulting companies;c) Public stakeholders such as regulatory agencies and local governments and civil society stakeholders and community groups from Uganda. Applicants must demonstrate an interest and experience in working in Uganda’s Mining sector and be willing to prepare and implement Return to Work Plans as part of their post-training actions. Each applicant is requested to write a cover letter justifying their eligibility for selection for training and fill in the Request for Applications form appended on this document.NB: Women and women-led organizations are highly encouraged to apply.Please note that incomplete applications will not be accepted.
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