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EOI – Uganda - Individual consultant to provide procurement specialist services - earth Energy 20MW biomass power project

 | Published April 19, 2017
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EOI – Uganda - Individual consultant to provide procurement specialist services - earth Energy 20MW biomass power project

Addendum: Extension of submission date for expression of interest - Uganda - Individual Consultant - Technical Assistants for strengthening the internal capacity of Uganda National Roads

 | Published January 10, 2017
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Addendum: Extension of submission date for expression of interest - Uganda - Individual Consultant - Technical Assistants for strengthening the internal capacity of Uganda National Roads

International Consultant and National Consultant to Prepare (LECB )-2 Project Document

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published November 2, 2016  -  Deadline February 16, 2017
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Capacity development is essential and central to countries’ efforts to successfully tackle climate change. This includes increasing institutional capacities to provide appropriate skills and mechanisms of support and coordination when addressing climate change risks. It includes strengthening technical knowledge in order to better understand and make use of climate information, and increasing relevant data and access to data for planning and informed decision making.One of the key decisions of the Paris Agreement was to Reaffirm the goal of limiting global temperature increase well below 2 degrees Celsius, while urging efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees; Establish binding commitments by all parties to make “nationally determined contributions” (NDCs), and to pursue domestic measures aimed at achieving them; Commit all countries to report regularly on their emissions and “progress made in implementing and achieving” their NDCs, and to undergo international review; Commit all countries to submit new NDCs every five years, with the clear expectation that they will “represent a progression” beyond previous ones; Reaffirm the binding obligations of developed countries under the UNFCCC to support the efforts of developing countries, while for the first time encouraging voluntary contributions by developing countries too; Extend the current goal of mobilizing $100 billion a year in support by 2020 through 2025, with a new, higher goal to be set for the period after 2025;From a National perspective, despite past and ongoing efforts Uganda has not yet reached the threshold for Climate Change Resilience (CCR) and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). Some of the key bottlenecks to reaching a minimum threshold for CCR/DRR are policy gaps related to integration and provision of funding for CCR and RDD policies and legal frameworks, gaps in policy implementation capacity i.e. planning, mainstreaming, coordination, monitoring and evaluation and weak capacities for adoption and adaptation of emerging technologies and methods for low carbon emission and CCR. As such, the UNDP in collaboration with Government of Uganda designed the Country Program Document (2016- 2020) with a component focusing on climate change and disaster risk reduction. The targeted outcome of this component is “ Natural resources management and energy access are gender responsive, effective and efficient, reducing emissions, negating the impact of climate-induced disasters and environmental degradation on livelihoods and production systems, and strengthened community resilience”. It is hoped that this shall be achieved by stepwise elimination of capacity gaps among MDAs, Parliament, CSOs and Private sector players through engagements that appraise their capacities to understand own contributions to GHG emissions and the resultant consequences to Uganda and the globe generally.The LECB Programme has received financial support worth 350,000 USD from German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) to support select countries in transforming national Climate Action Plan targets to actions. Uganda has been selected to receive support towards transforming National Climate Action Plan targets to actions.

National Consultant Risk Assessment Expert

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published May 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 19, 2017
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Uganda has witnessed several natural and human-induced disasters that have culminated into loss of life, property and displacements. The following have been prevalent: displacement, because of civil strife and natural disasters; famine as result of drought; transport accidents, earthquakes, epidemics, flooding, landslides, and environmental degradation resulting in increasing levels over risk.To reduce disaster losses and better manage disaster and climatic risks, Uganda’s Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) is increasing its efforts towards disaster risk management, with a focus on hazard assessment, exposure assessment, vulnerability assessment and risk assessment. With the support of UNDP, OPM has developed district-level hazard, vulnerability and risk profiles and maps for all 112 districts. Building on this evidence base at the district level, OPM has commissioned the development of a national methodology to support risk-informed development at the sub-national level. At the national level, OPM seeks to consolidate the work completed to date and develop a national risk atlas.The purpose of the national risk atlas is to guide and support decision-makers, both in the public and private sectors, make evidence-based, risk-informed investment and planning decisions. It is envisaged that the atlas will be housed at the National Emergency Coordination and Operations Centre, as a dynamic tool, supported by real-time information and draw from an array of existing systems and platforms.Objectives of the Consultancy:UNDP seeks to engaging a Risk Assessment Expert to provide technical inputs to hazard, exposure, vulnerability, and risk profiling in support of the development of the national risk atlas.

National Consultant Risk Information Management Expert

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published May 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 19, 2017
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Uganda has witnessed several natural and human-induced disasters that have culminated into loss of life, property and displacements. The following have been prevalent: displacement, because of civil strife and natural disaster; famine as result of drought; transport accidents, earthquakes, epidemics, flooding, landslides, and environmental degradation resulting in increasing levels over risk.To reduce disaster losses and better manage disaster and climatic risks, Uganda’s Office of the Prime Minister is increasing its efforts towards disaster risk management, with a focus on hazard assessment, at-risk mapping, vulnerability assessment and risk assessment. With the support of UNDP, OPM has completed hazard, risk and vulnerability profiles and maps for all 112 districts. Building on this evidence base at the district level, OPM has commissioned the development of a national methodology to support risk-informed development at the sub-national level. At the national level, OPM seeks to consolidate the work completed to date and develop a national risk atlas.The purpose of the national risk atlas is to guide and support decision-makers, both in the public and private sectors, make evidence-based, risk-informed investment and planning decisions. It is envisaged that the atlas will be housed at the National Emergency Coordination and Operations Centre, as a dynamic tool, supported by real-time information and draw from an array of existing systems and platforms.Objectives of the Consultancy:UNDP seeks to engaging a Risk Information Management Expert to provide data, spatial analysis (risk calculation in GIS), and data and information management inputs in support of the development of the national risk atlas.

National Consultant to undertake Rapid Assessment of Uganda’s Protected Areas (PAs)

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published May 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 19, 2017
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Uganda’s Protected areas (PA) cover approximately 16.3% of the country’s total land area[1] (NEMA, 2009). They are largely divided into three major categories that include: i) National Parks, Wildlife Reserves and Community Wildlife Sanctuaries; ii) Permanent Forest Estate (Forest Reserves); and iii) Ramsar sites[2]. Wildlife Protected Areas cover 11% of Uganda’s total area and hold about 50% of the country’s wildlife. They include: 10 National Parks and 12 Wildlife Reserves, 4 Ramsar sites, 7 Wildlife Sanctuaries, 13 Community Wildlife Areas, 3 Man and Biosphere (MAB) reserves and one site on the provisional world heritage list.The Republic of Uganda has, over the years, taken concrete steps to ensure that the conservation and sustainable management of her Protected Areas. Steps taken by the Government include the adoption of the National Environment Management Policy (1994); enactment of the i) Wildlife Act (2000), ii) National Forestry and Tree Planting Act (2003) and iii) National Environment Act (2005); development of several sectoral policies such as Community Conservation Policy 2004, Wildlife Policy 2014 and the Tourism Policy 2015.Despite the existence of these laws and policies as well as supportive international agreements, unsustainable human activities still pose a big challenge to the continued survival of Uganda’s rich biodiversity. Uganda’s natural resources are declining at an alarming rate. From 1994 to 2008, forest areas declined from 25 per cent to 15 per cent and wetland cover from 15.6 to 10.9 per cent[3] largely due to unsustainable production and consumption systems, limited alternative livelihoods opportunities and human wildlife conflict. There is also a significant unmet demand for funding of conservation which underscores the need for market solutions and private sector investment in achieving resource allocation and conservation goals.To preserve the health of natural ecosystems, significantly higher volumes of capital investment are required than the amounts currently allocated for conservation. Private sector investment therefore is needed, not to replace but to complement traditional sources of conservation capital such as public funding and philanthropy, which have been negatively impacted by the global economic downturn. Conservation finance provides an opportunity to addressing the problem of gross underinvestment in this area.Following a meeting between the President of Uganda H.E Yoweri Kaguta Museveni and Ms. Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator, at the ‘Giants Summit’ (hosted by the Republic of Kenya and the NGO Space for Giants in April 2016), where UNDP reiterated its will to support the Government of Uganda on environmental matters, it was thereafter agreed that in subsequent meetings between Government, Space for Giants and UNDP there was need for Uganda to develop an investment framework to harness emerging finance for conservation, especially into protected areas management. Further, that Uganda would thereafter host the Giants Club Conservation and Tourism Investment Forum to showcase the highlighted investment opportunities in Uganda’s Conservation sector.The Government of Uganda has requested UNDP to provide technical assistance to undertake an assessment of Uganda’s Protected Areas and their conservation potential. The purpose of this assessment is to establish and report on the conservation status of protected areas as part of a wider piece of work to determine suitability for investment. This builds on a parallel request by Government to the NGO Space for Giants to assess the investment platform and opportunity. In this regard, UNDP is seeking the services of a competent consultant to undertake a rapid assessment of the conservation status of Uganda’s ‘tier 2’ Protected Areas, namely its Wildlife Reserves, Sanctuaries and Community Wildlife Areas.[1] National Environment Management Authority (NEMA), 2009[2] Protected areas designated and managed under international law of Conventions[3] National State of the Environment Report, 2012

Disaster Loss and Damage Information System National Consultant

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published November 8, 2016  -  Deadline November 18, 2016
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Disasters are, for many Ugandans, an all too common occurrence. In the last decade alone, Uganda has experienced over 2,500 disaster events, causing death, destruction and lost opportunities. Over 70 per cent of natural hazards in Uganda are related to extreme hydro-meteorological events such as droughts, floods, severe thunder and lightning storms, among others. The impact this has had on the economy has been considerable, with a reduction in GDP of 3.5 percent on average from 2010 to 2014, according to the World Bank. While over half the country is vulnerable to drought, and a third to floods, communities along the fragile dryland cattle corridor, mountainous regions and informal urban settlements are at particular risk. It is estimated that 43 per cent of Ugandans could regress into poverty during shocks.[1]Recurring small-scale and slow-onset disasters particularly affect communities, households and small and medium-sized agriculture-related enterprises, and constitute a high percentage of all losses. All countries – especially developing countries, where mortality and economic losses from natural disasters are disproportionately higher – are faced with increasing levels of hidden costs. However, until now all this goes largely unaccounted for despite its potential effects on national planning for disaster management. Moreover, even when farmers choose to take risk transfer options that make partial or complete compensation for the losses, it is mostly not reported and compensation is not commensurate with the value of the losses.The national ‘Desinventar’ database[2] used to collect and analyze damages and losses is generic and not tailored to Uganda’s context. It does not provide enough flexibility to the Government of Uganda to configure it as per emerging needs and priorities of the country.Objective of the consultancy:UNDP is seeking to recruit a Project Associate to strengthen Uganda’s disaster and damage information system. Necessary support for strengthening the national disaster loss and damage information system will be provided by UNDP, including capacity development of relevant institutions and organizations for managing disaster data. The goal is to provide useful information and analysis based on the occurrences and impacts of the past disaster events to support policy and decision-making for preparedness, mitigation, response, and risk reduction. Appropriate linkages among existing institutions will be strengthened so as to ensure that data sharing across institutions is facilitated by the disaster management information system and the database provides inputs to support sustainable development in the country.[1] Government of Uganda. Second National Development Plan (NDPII) 2015/16 – 2019/20. Kampala, 2015. Print. [2] http://www.desinventar.net/DesInventar/profiletab.jsp?countrycode=uga

National Individual Consultant Information Management and Field Assistant

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published May 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 18, 2017
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Uganda has witnessed a number of natural and human-induced disasters that have culminated into loss of life, property and displacements. The following have been prevalent, displacement, as a result of civil strife and natural disaster; famine as result of drought; transport accidents, earthquake, epidemic, flooding, landslides, environmental degradation etc.To reduce disaster losses, OPM is increasing its efforts towards disaster risk management, with a focus on hazard assessment, at-risk mapping, vulnerability assessment and risk assessment, which all have an important spatial component.The use of geospatial information from remote sensing in geographic information systems (GIS) has become an integral, well developed and successful tool in disaster risk management. New GIS techniques, in particular, are revolutionizing the potential capacity to analyze hazards, vulnerability and risks, and plan for disasters. GIS software packages are used for information storage, situation analysis and modelling.Uganda's National Emergency Coordination and Operations Centre (NECOC) is a 24 hour, 7-days a week central facility for preparedness, early warning and the coordination of emergency and crisis response and recovery action. The NECOC is established under the National Policy for Disaster Preparedness and Management (NPDPM) with the purpose of contributing towards the functionality and characteristics that make creation of an integrated and multi-sectoral system approach to planning, preparedness and management of disasters that is fundamental to sustained productivity and socio-economic growth.To further enhance NECOC’s technical capacity, an Information Management and Field Assistant is sought to support information management related activities, including remoting sensing and geographic information system (GIS) activities and undertaking field-based ‘ground truthing’ in support of risk analysis, monitoring and reporting.Objectives of the Consultancy:The Information Management and Field Assistant will support information management-related information products from remote sensing and field data, support NECOC staff in product generation, data analysis/ interpretation and reporting for early warning.

EOI – Uganda - Individual Consultant for Study on the “Dynamics of the war to peace transition in Northern Uganda: economic impacts of households, communities, sectors and local bureaucracies” – EDRE – 06 2015

 | Published June 12, 2015
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REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (Individual Consultant) Study on the “Dynamics of the War to Peace Transition in Northern Uganda: Economic Impacts of Households, Communities, Sectors and Local Bureaucracies” 1. Background: The armed conflict between the Government of Uganda (GoU) and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in Northern Uganda destabilized the north in a number of ways including destroying rural households, forcing whole populations into makeshift displaced persons camps and abandoning their productive activities. Direct hostilities subsided in 2006 opening the doors for recovery. Several initiatives have since been put in place to help the affected communities transition back to normal life. An understanding of how these initiatives have helped the people to recover from the effects of the conflict is therefore important. 2. General objectives of the assignment: The goal of this study is to investigate how the households in Northern Uganda have responded to the return of peace and how this is reflected in their livelihood patterns, asset accumulation, demographic and migration patterns, and their demand for services. 3. Specific objectives of the assignment: i Participate in primary data survey in Northern Uganda ii Conduct data analysis iii Participate in producing one report addressing the proposed research questions iv Present in a workshop/conference to be organized by the research team v Co-author at least one publishable paper from the reports. 4. The call AfDB now invites eligible individual consultants to express their interest in providing these services. Interested consultants must provide information indicating that they are qualified to perform the services (description of similar assignments, experience in similar conditions etc.). 5. Eligibility The eligibility criteria, the establishment of a short list and the selection procedure shall be in conformity with the Bank’s Rules and Procedure for the Use of Consultants. Please, note that interest expressed by a Consultant does not imply any obligation on the part of the Bank to include him/her in the shortlist. The estimated duration of services is 6 months and the estimated starting date is 1st July 2015 Expressions of interest must be delivered to the address below by 18th June 2015 at 1200noon GMT+0.00. Electronic submissions by email to j.oduor@afdb.org will be accepted. Interested consultants may obtain further information at the address below during office hours (0800 to 1700 GMT+0.00, or write by email j.oduor@afdb.org Attention of Jacob Oduor Principal Research Economist, Research Department (EDRE), African Development Bank 01 BP 1387, Abidjan 01, Côte d’Ivoire Office Phone: +225 2026 1206, Email: j.oduor@afdb.org

National Consultant to Prepare the Uganda National Urban Climate Change Profile

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published December 22, 2016  -  Deadline March 13, 2017
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Uganda’s population is at 34.5 million, annual population growth rate of 3.1%, making it one of the fastest growing countries in Africa, Uganda is urbanizing at a rate of 18%, the urban population growth rate is over 5% per annum, It is projected that by 2035 the total population will be 68 million with about 30% (20 million) living in urban areas. Whereas this increase is associated with socio-economic transformation of the country, it has also led to increased vulnerability of our urban areas to the effects of disasters arising from climate changeIt is important to note that Climate change is a serious challenge for cities around the world, particularly in developing countries including Uganda where urbanization is happening at neck-breaking speed. It threatens to increase vulnerabilities, destroy economic gains, and hinder social and economic development. And the urban poor will bear the brunt of its effects since they live and work in informal settlements that are more exposed to hazards. Building resilience and adapting to climate change is increasingly a high priority for cities. Besides mitigation, on which efforts have largely focused in the past, cities should today play a larger role in adaptation. Whereas UNDP and various other development institutions are working with governments world over to strengthen their capacity to assess vulnerability to climate change impacts and to identify corresponding plans and investments to increase their resilience, their efforts have been greatly affected by lack of adequate and accurate information, thus making it quite difficult for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate change adaptability measures to be put in place.In view of the above the ministry with support from UNDP intends to undertake urban climate change profiling exercise in selected towns in Uganda to create a data base for their magnitude and form of vulnerability for decision making.Objective: The overall objective of the assignment is to carry out climate change profiling for selected urban centers in Uganda.

International Consultant for Terminal Evaluation for Low Emission Capacity Building Project

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 30, 2017  -  Deadline April 12, 2017
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Capacity development is essential and central to countries’ efforts to successfully tackle climate change. This includes increasing institutional capacities to provide appropriate skills and mechanisms of support and coordination when addressing climate change risks. It includes strengthening technical knowledge to better understand and make use of climate information, and increasing relevant data and access to data for planning and informed decision making.This EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Programme aimed at strengthening the technical and institutional capacity of Uganda in climate change mitigation actions that promote low emission (carbon) development in line with the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol frameworks while at the same time promoting socio-economic development. This action is primarily for enhancing the national capacity for establishing GHG emission inventory and MRV systems, and for developing NAMAs and LEDS. The Project further targeted enhancement of the national capacities and raising general knowledge and awareness on climate change, and provide support to the development of the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs). It also aimed at contributing to putting climate change issues higher on the national agenda through strengthened cooperation and increased involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the process, and strengthening and building national capacities for participation in different mechanisms related to low emission development and fulfilling other commitments to the UNFCCC.Project SummaryThe project was envisaged to achieved 3 major outcomes including:Robust national systems for preparation of GHG emission inventories have been established at a national level;NAMAs and LEDS have been formulated within the context of national development priorities;MRV systems have been created to support implementation and evaluation of NAMAs and LEDS.At mid-term, a review was carried out at global level to assess the implementation of the project as well as the extent to which it had achieved its intended objectives and results, and generating lessons learnt to guide the implementation of the remaining activities of Project. The Terminal Evaluation (TE) will be conducted per the guidance, rules and procedures established by UNDP as reflected in the ‘UNDP Guidance for Conducting Terminal Evaluations of UNDP-supported.The main objective of the evaluation is to assess project implementation, including how the design of the project has impacted on implementation, results, relevancy, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability, unexpected effects, and lessons.Objectives of the Evaluation:The subject of the evaluation is the project outcomes and outputs as well as the project processes by highlighting the results, challenges faced, lessons learnt, recommendations, and the impact on the targeted beneficiaries. The evaluation coverage will include the logic and underlying assumptions upon which the strategy was originally developed, and the implementation strategy that has been adopted.The evaluation shall assess the extent of achievement of the intended long term results defined in the PRODOC, and identify opportunities, challenges and lessons learnt during implementation, and determine relevance of a next phase of programming. In addition, the evaluation shall:identify the impact of project activities on the target beneficiaries, particularly regarding capacity for GHG emissions management and local economic development;Identify the changes in the policy/regulatory environment and the effects they have on capacity for GHG emissions management in Uganda;Identify results of the project that should be scaled up into the rest of the country.The findings from this evaluation will be used where necessary to improve on design, implementation and management of future projects and interventions.

National Consultant for Terminal Evaluation for Low Emmission for Capacity Building Project

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 30, 2017  -  Deadline April 12, 2017
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Capacity development is essential and central to countries’ efforts to successfully tackle climate change. This includes increasing institutional capacities to provide appropriate skills and mechanisms of support and coordination when addressing climate change risks. It includes strengthening technical knowledge to better understand and make use of climate information, and increasing relevant data and access to data for planning and informed decision making.This EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Programme aimed at strengthening the technical and institutional capacity of Uganda in climate change mitigation actions that promote low emission (carbon) development in line with the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol frameworks while at the same time promoting socio-economic development. This action is primarily for enhancing the national capacity for establishing GHG emission inventory and MRV systems, and for developing NAMAs and LEDS. The Project further targeted enhancement of the national capacities and raising general knowledge and awareness on climate change, and provide support to the development of the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs). It also aimed at contributing to putting climate change issues higher on the national agenda through strengthened cooperation and increased involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the process, and strengthening and building national capacities for participation in different mechanisms related to low emission development and fulfilling other commitments to the UNFCCC.Project SummaryThe project was envisaged to achieved 3 major outcomes including:Robust national systems for preparation of GHG emission inventories have been established at a national level;NAMAs and LEDS have been formulated within the context of national development priorities;MRV systems have been created to support implementation and evaluation of NAMAs and LEDS.At mid-term, a review was carried out at global level to assess the implementation of the project as well as the extent to which it had achieved its intended objectives and results, and generating lessons learnt to guide the implementation of the remaining activities of Project. The Terminal Evaluation (TE) will be conducted per the guidance, rules and procedures established by UNDP as reflected in the ‘UNDP Guidance for Conducting Terminal Evaluations of UNDP-supported.Purpose of evaluation:The purpose of an independent terminal evaluation is to assess the project’s achievements against the set objectives, identify and document lessons learnt (including design issues, lessons and best practices that can be up-scaled or replicated), and quantify the project’s contribution to the Government of Uganda’s efforts vis-à-vis national and international commitments to climate change mitigation and the implementation of the National Policy Climate change.As an integral part of the project cycle, the evaluation will analyze effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, impact and potential for sustainability of the project. It will also identify factors that have affected project implementation and facilitated or impeded the achievement of the objectives and attainment of results. Findings from the evaluation are expected to be used by UNDP, the Climate change department, Government ministries and Departments that have mainstreamed climate change, district local governments and local communities.Objectives of the evaluation:The main objective of the evaluation is to assess project implementation, including how the design of the project has impacted on implementation, results, relevancy, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability, unexpected effects, and lessons.The subject of the evaluation is the project outcomes and outputs as well as the project processes by highlighting the results, challenges faced, lessons learnt, recommendations, and the impact on the targeted beneficiaries. The evaluation coverage will include the logic and underlying assumptions upon which the strategy was originally developed, and the implementation strategy that has been adopted.The evaluation shall assess the extent of achievement of the intended long term results defined in the PRODOC, and identify opportunities, challenges and lessons learnt during implementation, and determine relevance of a next phase of programming. In addition, the evaluation shall:identify the impact of project activities on the target beneficiaries, particularly regarding capacity for GHG emissions management and local economic developmentIdentify the changes in the policy/regulatory environment and the effects they have on capacity for GHG emissions management in UgandaIdentify results of the project that should be scaled up into the rest of the countryThe findings from this evaluation will be used where necessary to improve on design, implementation and management of future projects and interventions.

National Consultant for Wetland Restoration Needs Assessment in Eastern and South-Western Uganda

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published October 4, 2016  -  Deadline October 15, 2016
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Uganda is endowed with abundant natural resources, including land, water, soil, climate and diverse range of magnificent scenery, flora and fauna; rich mineral deposits and friendly people. The country’s economy remains largely dependent on these natural resources upon which over 80% of the population derives its livelihood. Unfortunately, the natural resource base is declining at an alarming rate.Uganda has largely put in place many policies, legal and institutional frameworks and implemented various initiatives towards sustainable natural and environmental resource management, and economic growth. However, there are four outstanding bottlenecks that are affecting efforts in addressing the increasing degradation of natural resources in effective, efficient and sustainable ways. These are; (i) gaps in policies and legal framework for integrated and coordinated efforts in natural resource management, livelihood and job creation, (ii) inadequate capacities for coherent and efficient implementation of policies that integrate natural resource management, livelihoods and job creation, including capacities for innovation and adaptation, (iii) inadequate capacities for engaging communities in natural resources management and climate change response efforts and, (iv) overdependence on biomass energy sources.The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in collaboration with the Ministry of Water and Environment (Lead Implementing Partner) and other Stakeholders is implementing the Inclusive Green Growth for Poverty Reduction Programme. The Programme will aim at providing technical, technological, operational and financial support to the relevant Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) and non-state institutions so thatThis will result into improved quality of natural resources as a result of reduced degradation and improved livelihoods and greener jobs through applying more sustainable practices due to policy recommendations.Justification:There are gaps and incoherencies in the policy and legal framework due to inadequate capacity of Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) to undertake cross sectoral diagnostic and analytical studies, develop and implement integrated plans, policies and legal frameworks pertaining to natural resource management, livelihoods and job creation; lack of incentive frameworks for the private sector to invest in sustainable production and consumption activities; lack of comprehensive communication strategies on natural resource management, livelihoods and job creation.These gaps have continued to affect sustainable use of natural resources that create jobs and improve people’s livelihoods.Objective:The overall objective of this assignment is to undertake a thorough review of the existing policies and strategies taking into account identification of gaps in environment, natural resources, livelihoods and job creation.

Consultant to develop a “Multi-hazard Early warning dissemination tools and Manuals

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published November 16, 2016  -  Deadline December 2, 2016
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The UNDP/GEF funded Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems (SCIEWS) project is being implemented in 11 Least Developed Countries in Africa including Uganda. The overall objective of the project is “to strengthen the weather, climate and hydrological monitoring capabilities, early warning systems and available information for responding to extreme weather and planning adaptation to climate change in Uganda.” This will be achieved by delivering two integrated and complementary outcomes:Enhanced capacity of the Department of Meteorology (DoM) and Department of Water Resource Monitoring and Assessments (DWRM) to monitor and forecast extreme weather, hydrology and climate change.Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and long-term development plans.The SCIEWS project is being implemented by the Ministry of Water and Environment(MWE) , with the Uganda National Meteorological Authority (UNMA) as the lead partner, among others: the Directorate of Water Resources Management(DWRM); the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) Department of Relief, Disaster Preparedness and Management; Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries; the Ministry of Local Government; the Ministry of Finance Planning and Economic Development; and the Uganda Communications Commission. Implementation of the project commenced in March 2014 and is expected to end by December, 2017.Rationale of the Consultancy:The UNDP/GEF funded SCIEWS project is building capacity of different Ministries and Agencies to collect and analyse data and generate information for early warning. However, there is lack of Information Education and Communications materials tools and manuals for National and Local level Early warning disseminations, and Training of Trainers training for efficient and effective use Early warning Bulletins and alerts.This consultancy is necessary to develop and operationalize a toolbox for disseminating early warning at the national and local levels. This includes a gender sensitive trainer Manual on the use of communication tools for disseminating early warning messages.

National Consultant to support the Presidential Advisory Committee on th Budget

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published November 15, 2016  -  Deadline November 25, 2016
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The Project rationale/background and objectives:UNDP and Government of Uganda is implementing 2016-2020 Country programme that is aligned to the National Development Plan. Under the programme, UNDP is supporting the Gou in building institutional capacity for effective service delivery. Under the Institutional Effectiveness programme, UNDP seeks to support Office of the Prime Minister with Technical Assistance to the Presidential Advisory Committee on Budget.Context of the required services:The Presidential advisory committee that was established in 2013 to ensure that the Ruling Party Manifesto, the National Development Plan and Vision 2040 priorities are mainstreamed in the budgeting process. The Committee works under the stewardship the Vice President and the Prime Minister with the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) providing the secretariat. The coordination and facilitation of activities of the various stakeholders is assigned to the Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development through the Office of the Government Chief Whip. The Committee is charged with prioritization of resources to boost production, alignment of sector plans and budgets to strategic priorities, identification of sources of generating revenue, and advising Government on how to improve on service delivery. The Committee comprises of the following five sub committees: Social Services Sub-committee (Education, Sports, Health and Social Development); Physical Infrastructure Sub-committee (Works, Transport, Water, Environment, ICT, Lands, Housing and Urban Development); Governance and Public Administration Sub-committee (Security, Justice, Law and Order, Accountability, Public Administration, Legislature, Public Sector Management); Agriculture, Trade, Industry and Tourism Sub-committee (Agriculture, Animal Industry, Fisheries, Tourism, Trade and Industry); and Revenue and Budget Sub-committee (to propose revenue enhancement measures in consultation with URA).Starting financial year 2017/18, the Government of Uganda plans to roll out the ‘Program Based Budgeting’ (PBB) aimed at improving budget efficiency and transparency. PBB replaces the current ‘Output Based Budgeting’ to strengthen coherence in planning and budgeting and improve accountability. The implementation of these changes require enhanced capacity of PACOB to guide preparation a national budget that is consistent with the new developments.The relevance/purpose of the work required and how it is linked to the project context:To effectively deliver on its mandate as secretariat to PACOB, OPM has secured support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to recruit a Technical Advisor for the Presidential Advisory Committee on the Budget (PACOB). The technical assistance will provide advisory support to the PACOB Secretariat and its committees to enhance the analytical rigor in the scrutiny of the 2017/18 budget call circular and budget strategy to ensure prioritization and alignment of sector budgets to Vision 2040, NDP II, national, regional, continental and global commitments, within the framework of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA). The assistance will also strengthen the institutional capacity for budgeting, expenditure management and the financial management of government operations.

International Consultant to Conduct Rapid Feasibility Study for Adopting the Songhai Model for Integrated Natural Resources Management, Livelihoods Improvement and Green

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published October 4, 2016  -  Deadline October 7, 2016
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Uganda the “Pearl of Africa” is endowed with abundant natural resources upon which the economy and livelihood of over 80% of the population largely depends. However, this natural resource base is declining at an alarming rate. Four outstanding bottlenecks are hindering the national efforts in addressing the increasing degradation of natural resources, namely:gaps in policies and legal framework for integrated/coordinated efforts in Natural Resource Management, livelihood and job creation;inadequate capacities for coherent and efficient implementation of policies on natural resources management, livelihoods and job creation, including capacities for innovation, adaptation and development of home-grown solutions;inadequate capacities for engaging communities in natural resources management and climate change response efforts, and Over-dependence on biomass energy sources using inefficient technologies.The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in collaboration with the Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development (MGLSD) the Responsible Party), Ministry of Water and Environment (Lead Implementing Partner) and other Stakeholders are implementing Inclusive Green Growth for Poverty Reduction Programme. The Programme will aim at providing technical, technological, operational and financial support to the relevant Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) and non-state institutions so that:at the upstream level, by 2017 policies and legal/regulatory frameworks are strengthened and linked for Natural Resource Management, livelihood and job creation;at mid-stream level, by 2018 Natural Resource Management policies and legal frameworks are operationalized in inclusive and adequately coordinated manner;at downstream level, by 2019 the public is empowered to engage in sustainable Natural Resource Management and;by 2020 cost-effective alternative energy solutions for domestic needs are scaled-up.The primary beneficiaries of the project are the women (adult), youth (young females and males) and Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) especially the poor so that their productive and income generation capacities and livelihood opportunities are improved in an environmentally sustainable manner.In line with the above, MGLSD is seeking for services of a consultant to Conduct Rapid Feasibility Study for Adopting the Songhai Model for Integrated Natural Resources Management, Livelihoods Improvement and Green Job CreationObjective of the consultancy:The overall objective of this assignment is to Conduct Rapid Feasibility Study for Adopting the Songhai Model for Integrated Natural Resources Management, Livelihoods Improvement and Green Job CreationThe specific areas of the assignment are to include:Evaluating the existing Technology & Training in place supporting the model;Evaluating the value addition required for the existing food and manufacturing products;Evaluating the market potential;Evaluating policies and laws in place safeguarding the Model;Evaluating Small & Medium enterprises in place to implement the model;Evaluate the raw materials in place.

National Consultant on participatory development of training curricula for implementing Sustainable land and Forestry management (SLM/ SFM) and Climate Change Mitigation (CCM) in Land use plans

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 6, 2017  -  Deadline April 13, 2017
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The Government of Uganda through the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF) with support from United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) is implementing the project “Integrated Landscape Management for Ecosystem Resilience and Improved Livelihoods in the Mt. Elgon Region” in the districts of Mbale, Bulambuli and Manafwa. The overall goal of the project is to empower communities in Mt Elgon to manage their production landscapes in an integrated manner for improved livelihoods and ecosystem resilience.Mt Elgon landscape presents a variety of ecosystems providing services upon which local population heavily depends. A large portion of the landscape is now degraded, considering current changes in land use due to expansion of agriculture fields and human settlements, largely driven by high population growth. There is also increasing pressure on the land to accommodate a population that is still rising in the Mt Elgon region and the inherent danger is that this increasing pressure for land will impact negatively on land use, such as a) causing trees to be cut for fuel wood before maturing and b) increase encroachment into the upper protected watersheds c) increased land fragmentation d) increased soil erosion. Furthermore, it should be noted that women play a dominant role in land management despite the fact that they have limited control and access to knowledge and capacity building opportunities.The current approaches to natural resource use do not adequately integrate sustainable development principles and the socio-economic approaches that enhance innovative and transformative development initiatives. This is partly because training programs do not adequately integrate cleaner and greener production approaches or integrate entrepreneur skills. Furthermore, training programs are not adequately tagged to local needs nor do focus on practical skilling making them ineffective in addressing the social economic and environmental needs.In addition, there is limited knowledge of the concepts of Sustainable Land Management (SLM) sustainable forest management (SFM) and climate change mitigation (CCM). There is also limited access to skilled extension services and as such there has been increased reliance on community based trainers and learning systems without adequate knowledge of the concepts of SLM, SFM and CCM. To effectively implement SLM, SFM and CCM, there is need to promote learning approaches that enhance the landscape approach, innovation and integrate gender, sustainability and entrepreneurship principles in natural resource use and management.Accordingly the Ministry would like to engage a consultant to develop a training curriculum for implementing SLM, SFM and CCM in Land use plans through community delivery system e.g. the Community trainers, FFS, extension workers etc in Mbale, Bulambuli and Manafwa Districts with the following objectiveObjective of assignment:To develop a training curricula for implementation of SLM, SFM and CCM technologies and approaches at community levelThe project stakeholders will include farmers, Local community Leaders, CBOs, Local NGOs, FBOs, Schools, Teachers Training Colleges, extension workers.

National Consultant on participatory development of guidelines, strategies and recommendations for implementing SLM, SFM and CCM in Land use plans in Mbale, Bulambuli and Manafwa Districts

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 5, 2017
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Mt Elgon landscape presents a variety of ecosystems providing services upon which local population heavily depends. A large portion of the landscape is now degraded, considering current changes in land use due to expansion of agriculture fields and human settlements, largely driven by high population growth especially the higher percentage of women as compared to men yet control of land is in the hands of men. There is also increasing pressure on the land to accommodate a population that is still rising in the Mt Elgon region and the inherent danger is that this increasing pressure for land will impact negatively on land use, such as a) causing trees to be cut for fuel wood before maturing and b) increase encroachment into the upper protected watersheds c) increased land fragmentation d) increased soil erosion. Furthermore, it should be noted that women play a dominant role in land management despite the fact that they have limited control and access to knowledge and capacity building opportunities.Coupled with the above, the level of adoption of better land use practices has been tremendously low and uncoordinated. The area is characterised by land fragmentation, population pressure, the terrain and the varying needs of the different farmer categories.There is limited knowledge on how to implement Sustainable Land Management (SLM) sustainable forest management (SFM) and climate change mitigation (CCM). There is also limited access to extension services, limited or no innovation in land use management, and no incentives to improve land use practices. Non-application of sustainable land use practices is driven by limited ‘knowhow’ and technical capabilities to do so. There is a need to demonstrate how this can be done in practice but such demonstration has not been yet available in the Mount Elgon landscape.The Government of Uganda through the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF) with support from United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) is implementing the project “Integrated Landscape Management for Ecosystem Resilience and Improved Livelihoods in the Mt. Elgon Region” in the districts of Mbale, Bulambuli and Manafwa. The overall goal of the project is to empower communities in Mt Elgon to manage their production landscapes in an integrated manner for improved livelihoods and ecosystem resilience.Objective of assignment:Overall the assignment is to develop guidelines, strategies and measures for implementing SLM, SFM and CCM in Land use plans in highland agro ecological zones (Case study – Mbale, Bulambuli and Manafwa Districts). It is expected that the consultant will:Develop a strategy for implementing SLM, SFM and CCM in highland agro ecological zones (Mbale, Bulambuli and Manafwa Districts);Develop implementation guidelines for SLM, SFM and CCM in highland agro ecological zones (Mbale, Bulambuli and Manafwa Districts);Provide a framework for strengthening the capacity of District Local Government, Extension Staff and Farmers to undertake monitoring and data management in SLM, SFM and CCM.The project stakeholders include farmers, Local Leaders, government agencies namely: The 3 DLGs, the 6 LLGs, MWE, MLHUD, Ministry of Trade, UNMA, NARO, NEMA, NFA, UWA, NGOs, CBOs, FBOs and MAAIF the lead implementing agency. These stakeholders are responsible for accomplishing this particular task.

International/National Consultant to undertake a Study to Quantify Government of Uganda Contribution on Refugee Hosting

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 8, 2017  -  Deadline April 3, 2017
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Uganda has hosted refugees from across Africa, and beyond, since the 1940s. Uganda’s refugee laws are among the most progressive in the world. Refugees and asylum seekers are entitled to work; have freedom of movement; and can access Ugandan social services, such as health and education. Based on its non-camp policy, Uganda provides refugees with land for living and agriculture in open settlements.As the number of refugees and asylum seekers in Uganda crosses 1 million, government spending on refugee hosting remains unclear. Overall, government spending for the reception and integration of people seeking international protection varies significantly across countries. It is particularly difficult to assess given its distribution across various parts of the central government and across government levels. Spending related to refugee settlement and asylum covers many different items, ranging from the registration and processing of asylum applications, to providing long-term integration services. Without quantifying the costs, the Government of Uganda has been unable to accurately present the contribution Uganda makes to the global response to displacement.Objective of the consultancy:The objective of the study is to answer the central question: How much is the Government of Uganda’s contribution to the refugee hosting?The study is expected to:Provide an evidence-based methodology on calculating costs both direct and indirect to government towards the hosting of refugee in Uganda;Support the Government of Uganda highlight its contribution in responding to displacement both in kind and financial over the last three to five years;Transfer the approach and knowledge to the responsible within the government to ensure continuity of the analysis; andEnsure policy makers, parliamentarians, international community, civil society, private sector and the general public are adequately informed on the cost with accurate data.

National Consultant to document lessons learned from NAPA pilots and non-NAPA climate change adaptation initiatives

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 6, 2017  -  Deadline March 16, 2017
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The Project “Supporting Developing Countries to Integrate Agriculture Sectors into National Adaptation Plans (NAP-Ag)” is Directly implemented by UNDP and FAO in Uganda and 7 other countries. The project has goal of integrating climate change concerns related to agriculture-based livelihoods within existing national planning and budgeting processes of the selected countries. The integration of adaptation options in planning frameworks and budgets is expected to contribute to the enhancement of:Institutional capacities and processes for operationalizing climate response strategies in the agricultural sector;Access to international financing opportunities, such as the climate finance sources from GEF and Green Climate Fund; andMore strategic allocations of national budgets earmarked for adaptation investments;The results and processes used will be highly relevant to inform other sectors of good practices in integrating adaptation needs into national planning and budgeting;Lessons and experiences from the other 7 countries where similar interventions are being implemented. The Uganda component of the three-year program in is supported by the German Federal Ministry of the Environment’s (BMUB) and International Climate Initiative (IKI); with USD$700,000 earmarked to support interventions. This project responds to UNFCCC conclusions that invited UN organizations, specialized agencies, and bilateral organizations to enhance financial and technical support to the NAP process for developing countries. Through the NAP-Ag project, FAO and UNDP will extend technical assistance to the Government of Uganda and other partners in developing and implementing a National Adaptation Plan (NAP) for the Agriculture Sector.The NAP process in Uganda will build on previous government responses to climate challenges, such as developing the National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) in 2007. The NAPAs were considered as immediate interventions that have to be implemented in response to climate change challenges. Priority interventions were identified by agricultural stakeholders in the country, to cushion the country from climate change impacts and effects. The NAPA projects were implemented and have provided lessons that can be used for development and implementation of NAPs process.Results of this consultancy shall contribute to Outcome 4 - Advocacy and knowledge-sharing on NAPs promoted and to Output 4.1 Convened exchanges on science and technology and economics of adaptation to support the integration of adaptation options into national investment plans managed. The target will be use the information to Sensitize technical staff and public service providers on the work that government is already doing, review existing materials and develop awareness and training materials to address the knowledge gaps on NAPs, NAPAs and the NAP process, Conduct cost benefit analyses for the different interventions in NAPA projects.?Objective:To create awareness on what government and other partners are already doing on Climate change adaptation and Mitigation in order to build national capacities for management of climate change adaptation, particularly including documentation of lessons learned from the NAPA pilots.