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EOI – Uganda - Individual consultant to provide procurement specialist services - earth Energy 20MW biomass power project

 | Published April 19, 2017
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EOI – Uganda - Individual consultant to provide procurement specialist services - earth Energy 20MW biomass power project

Addendum: Extension of submission date for expression of interest - Uganda - Individual Consultant - Technical Assistants for strengthening the internal capacity of Uganda National Roads

 | Published January 10, 2017
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Addendum: Extension of submission date for expression of interest - Uganda - Individual Consultant - Technical Assistants for strengthening the internal capacity of Uganda National Roads

National Consultant to draft a Climate Change Policy Brief

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published July 17, 2018  -  Deadline July 31, 2018
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Undoubtedly, climate change is one of the key development challenges facing Uganda and the other developing countries at large. The country has been ravaged by the effects of climate change over the years associated with costly aftermaths in form of damaged social and physical infrastructure, loss of lives, reversal of past development achievements such as poverty reduction and impeding the achievement of targeted economic growth rates as reported by the mid-term review of the first National Development Plan (NDPI 2009/10-2014/15).The Uganda Vision 2040 and the NDPII have squarely integrated climate change and the approach is building national resilience along a low carbon development path. However, more needs to be done to actualize all planned climate change interventions. It is important to note that climate change integration and awareness creation are continuous processes that ought to be undertaken at every planning cycle if the effects of climate change are to be contained. Accordingly, the National Planning Authority in with financial support from the UNDP plans to develop a succinct but concrete policy brief on climate change in light of development planning: Moving from integration to implementation. This policy brief is envisaged to articulate the key climate change development planning issues and also recommend pragmatic recommendations on how to transition from the planning and integration phase to the actual implementation of climate change interventions. This exercise will be undertaken by a consultant under the direct supervision of the National Planning Authority.Objective:The overall purpose of the assignment to develop a policy brief on climate change in the light of development planning; Moving from integration to implementation. The assignment will be undertaken through consultancy services under the direct supervision of the National Planning Authority.

International Consultant and National Consultant to Prepare (LECB )-2 Project Document

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published November 2, 2016  -  Deadline February 16, 2017
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Capacity development is essential and central to countries’ efforts to successfully tackle climate change. This includes increasing institutional capacities to provide appropriate skills and mechanisms of support and coordination when addressing climate change risks. It includes strengthening technical knowledge in order to better understand and make use of climate information, and increasing relevant data and access to data for planning and informed decision making.One of the key decisions of the Paris Agreement was to Reaffirm the goal of limiting global temperature increase well below 2 degrees Celsius, while urging efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees; Establish binding commitments by all parties to make “nationally determined contributions” (NDCs), and to pursue domestic measures aimed at achieving them; Commit all countries to report regularly on their emissions and “progress made in implementing and achieving” their NDCs, and to undergo international review; Commit all countries to submit new NDCs every five years, with the clear expectation that they will “represent a progression” beyond previous ones; Reaffirm the binding obligations of developed countries under the UNFCCC to support the efforts of developing countries, while for the first time encouraging voluntary contributions by developing countries too; Extend the current goal of mobilizing $100 billion a year in support by 2020 through 2025, with a new, higher goal to be set for the period after 2025;From a National perspective, despite past and ongoing efforts Uganda has not yet reached the threshold for Climate Change Resilience (CCR) and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). Some of the key bottlenecks to reaching a minimum threshold for CCR/DRR are policy gaps related to integration and provision of funding for CCR and RDD policies and legal frameworks, gaps in policy implementation capacity i.e. planning, mainstreaming, coordination, monitoring and evaluation and weak capacities for adoption and adaptation of emerging technologies and methods for low carbon emission and CCR. As such, the UNDP in collaboration with Government of Uganda designed the Country Program Document (2016- 2020) with a component focusing on climate change and disaster risk reduction. The targeted outcome of this component is “ Natural resources management and energy access are gender responsive, effective and efficient, reducing emissions, negating the impact of climate-induced disasters and environmental degradation on livelihoods and production systems, and strengthened community resilience”. It is hoped that this shall be achieved by stepwise elimination of capacity gaps among MDAs, Parliament, CSOs and Private sector players through engagements that appraise their capacities to understand own contributions to GHG emissions and the resultant consequences to Uganda and the globe generally.The LECB Programme has received financial support worth 350,000 USD from German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) to support select countries in transforming national Climate Action Plan targets to actions. Uganda has been selected to receive support towards transforming National Climate Action Plan targets to actions.

National Consultant Risk Assessment Expert

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published May 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 19, 2017
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Uganda has witnessed several natural and human-induced disasters that have culminated into loss of life, property and displacements. The following have been prevalent: displacement, because of civil strife and natural disasters; famine as result of drought; transport accidents, earthquakes, epidemics, flooding, landslides, and environmental degradation resulting in increasing levels over risk.To reduce disaster losses and better manage disaster and climatic risks, Uganda’s Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) is increasing its efforts towards disaster risk management, with a focus on hazard assessment, exposure assessment, vulnerability assessment and risk assessment. With the support of UNDP, OPM has developed district-level hazard, vulnerability and risk profiles and maps for all 112 districts. Building on this evidence base at the district level, OPM has commissioned the development of a national methodology to support risk-informed development at the sub-national level. At the national level, OPM seeks to consolidate the work completed to date and develop a national risk atlas.The purpose of the national risk atlas is to guide and support decision-makers, both in the public and private sectors, make evidence-based, risk-informed investment and planning decisions. It is envisaged that the atlas will be housed at the National Emergency Coordination and Operations Centre, as a dynamic tool, supported by real-time information and draw from an array of existing systems and platforms.Objectives of the Consultancy:UNDP seeks to engaging a Risk Assessment Expert to provide technical inputs to hazard, exposure, vulnerability, and risk profiling in support of the development of the national risk atlas.

Consultant to develop guides to scale up big data initiatives

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published July 6, 2018  -  Deadline July 18, 2018
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UN Global Pulse (http://www.unglobalpulse.org/about-new) is a United Nations innovation initiative on Big Data. Its vision is a future in which big data is harnessed safely and responsibly as a public good. Its mission is to accelerate discovery, development and scaled adoption of big data innovation for sustainable development and humanitarian action. Global Pulse is building a catalytic network of in-country innovation centers, which will test new tools, data and analysis, share what lessons with the global community, mainstream successful approaches for real-time impact monitoring into policymaking. The first Lab was established in New York (Pulse Lab New York) followed by Jakarta, Indonesia and Kampala, Uganda. Pulse Lab Kampala (http://www.unglobalpulse.org/kampala) is established as an inter-agency initiative lead by the United Nations Resident Coordinator in Uganda. The first of its kind in Africa, it brings together researchers from Government, the UN, non-governmental organizations and private sector to explore the utility of new sources of digital “Big Data” (such as social media, mobile data, online information) and real-time analysis techniques for social development monitoring and program planning.A data revolution is underway in Uganda and in Africa. There is more data now than ever. New technologies are leading to an exponential increase in the volume and types of data available, creating unprecedented possibilities for informing and transforming society and protecting the environment. There is more data produced in the last 2 years than in all human history. There is a tremendous potential in new technology; indeed, this is the forefront of the data revolution already well underway in in the private sector. The new SDGs agenda will have increased demands – and opportunities- for the use of data. Pulse Lab Kampala supports the UN Country team to tap into the revolution obtaining more and better data to support development work and humanitarian action supporting: Enhance Early Warning: Detection of anomalous trends and patterns of events enables early warning of emerging crises and earlier responses to prevent long-term harm;Real-Time Awareness: An up-to-date picture of trends, hotspots and dynamic changes in population behaviour enhances programme planning and monitoring of implementation and;Rapid Impact Monitoring and Evaluation: Timely feedback on the impact of programmes and policies allows for adaptive course correction and accelerated achievement of results.Objectives of the consultancy:The consultant will work home-based with the team at Pulse Lab Kampala and partners and will contribute with his/her knowledge as expert on scaling up big data initiatives.

Consultant for Local Economic Development for Equitable Growth in Uganda

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 7, 2017  -  Deadline August 17, 2017
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The United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) is a UN organization with a capital mandate (unique in the UN System) focused on reducing poverty and inequality first and foremost in the least developed countries (“LDC”s). UNCDF develops and tests out financial models which mobilize and recycle domestic resources to meet local needs and which raise investor confidence in these local economies so that they can become centres of growth. UNCDF works with local governments, promoting financial and fiscal accountability to its citizens through local development funds, performance-based grant systems, structured project finance, and by strengthening local revenue streams. It also supports accountable planning, budgeting, and decision-making at the local level, recognizing the importance of having decisions about resources being made locally, and those resources being spent or invested locally.UNCDF in partnership with the Cities Alliance, the global partnership for poverty reduction and the promotion of cities in sustainable development with a representative global membership of over 30 full and associate members is implementing the Joint Work Proramme on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities in Uganda. The JWP on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities (2016-2020) focuses on supporting equitable access to public goods and services by all citizens and formal and informal businesses in cities. It works with development partners to produce global knowledge, facilitate policy dialogues and support city-level diagnostics and policy recommendations. The goal is to support growth trajectories increasingly characterised by equity, inclusion and environmental sustainability.UNCDF is specifically responsible for implementation of JWP Component 3: The Campaign Cities Initiative. The main objective is to assist two municipal governments in Uganda, the municipalities of Gulu and Mbale, to develop well-researched and evidence-based policy recommendations on how to improve the delivery of municipal public goods and service that contribute to equitable economic growth. Also, the project will facilitate UNCDF and other JWP members to support the promotion of equitable access to public goods and services in the selected Ugandan cities, based on local needs, capacities and priorities.During a 24-month local support initiative, the two Ugandan municipalities will be assisted in producing a number of outputs, such as an Institutional Enabling Environment Report, a Local Assessment Report, and city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations. Two themes were identified through a participatory and consultative process for Local Assessment Reports in Gulu and Mbale – Public Space and Land Management, and Local Economic Development. Local Assessment Reports are intended to provide detailed information about a particular public service, its scope, delivery mechanisms and recommendations about service improvements required to promote equitable economic growth. A Local Assessment Report contains a situation analysis and mapping of the city economy in terms of factors, systems and structures related to the provision of and access to public goods, resulting in a clearly documented evidence base. It is the key input to inform city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations to specify policy, legal and regulatory actions to be employed by municipal authorities to implement the LAR recommendations.Objectives of the Consultancy:Municipal governments are the primary agents for LED because they address a wide range of economic development needs and issues: business regulations and infrastructure, tax, sites and premises, waste collection, education and training. They can identify and provide leadership, and organize coalitions and partnerships within a city and region. They have the democratic mandate and responsibility, and represent the needs of the entire community.The New Urban Development Agenda (2016) stresses the need to take advantage of the opportunities of urbanization as an engine of sustained and inclusive economic growth, social and cultural development, and environmental protection, and of its potential contributions to the achievement of transformative and sustainable development. Specifically, it calls on businesses to apply their creativity and innovation toward solving sustainable development challenges in urban areas, acknowledging that private business activity, investment, and innovation are major drivers of productivity, inclusive growth and job creation and that private investment is an essential element of development efforts.Hence, UNCDF seeks to engage a Consultant to prepare a Local Assessment Report on Local Economic Development in Gulu and Mbale and perform other relevant activities associated with this output. The objective of the LAR is to establish a reliable evidence base with respect to the public space and land management in the target municipalities from the perspective of public service delivery that fosters equitable economic growth.

National Consultant to prepare Communication Materials

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 17, 2017  -  Deadline August 31, 2017
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The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) sets an overall framework for intergovernmental efforts to tackle the challenge posed by climate change. It recognizes that the climate system is a shared resource whose stability can be affected by industrial and other emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.Under the UNFCCC, governments gather and share information on national policies and best practices, greenhouse gas emissions; launch national strategies for addressing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to expected impacts, including the provision of financial and technological support to developing countries; cooperate in preparing for adaptation to the impacts of climate changeAction for climate change education (ACE) of the Convention seeks to promote action at the national and local level to provide the education, training and public awareness needed to understand and deal with climate change impacts.Moving forward the Government of Uganda ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC and its Kyoto Protocol in 1993 and 2002 respectively.In response to its commitments under the Convention and decisions of the Conference of the Parties, Uganda has made considerable effort taken big and bold steps towards the implementation of the Convention by:Signing and Ratifying the Paris AgreementSubmitted and supports implementation of the Nationally Determined ContributionsPreparation and submission of its the National Communication, which identify sources of greenhouse gases and corresponding mitigations, vulnerable sectors and adaptation options and measures to be taken given financial support;Preparation of National Adaptation Programmes of Action, (NAPA) which identified immediate and urgent adaptation actions at community level to minimize vulnerability of communities. Embarked on the NAPs development.Given the high vulnerability of rural communities in Uganda, appropriate communication of adaptation strategies across all sectors is of utmost importance. Food security for instance relies to a large extent on rain fed and subsistence agriculture. This implies that food production and farming systems will have to cope with the changing climate patterns, such as increased droughts, floods, serious changes in precipitation cycles, affecting planting calendars and crop choices. In addition to water scarcity and increased climate variability, natural resources such as soil and plants will need to be more carefully managed taking climate risks into account.In this regard, therefore public awareness, exchange of information and communication are important components that are crosscutting to the entirety of attempts undertaken by Uganda to implement the UNFCCC, Kyoto Protocol and he Paris Agreement. To that end there is therefore need to assess the level of awareness and design communication materials that respond to those needs identified. Due to the complexity of the climate change dilemma its critical that the climate change messages are communicated successfully considering many different groups including local communities, partners in implementation both state and non-state, opinion leaders/formers, and other key stakeholders.The purpose of the assignment therefore is to develop a more systematic, effective and harmonized approach towards supporting NDC implementation, through communication and outreach on climate change and dissemination to promote public - private actor’s participation while taking into consideration the needs of the vulnerable groups, mechanisms of communication, heterogeneity of Ugandan population and various levels of education amongst information users.

National Consultant to prepare NDCs Implementation Plan

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 17, 2017  -  Deadline August 31, 2017
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In 2015 the world endorsed an ambitious agenda for Sustainable Development and a landmark agreement to avert run away climate change. Attention now turns to implementing the unprecedented global commitments encompassed by the Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement and ultimately the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).At the heart of the Paris Agreement (PA) is the mitigation target; limiting global temperature rise well below 2 degrees Celsius, while making every effort to realize the 1.5 degrees, leading to net zero emissions in the second half of the century; Establish binding commitments and urged all parties to submit Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), and to pursue domestic measures aimed at achieving them; Commit all countries to report regularly on their emissions and “progress made in implementing and achieving” their NDCs, and to undergo international review; Commit all countries to submit new NDCs every five years, with the clear expectation that they will “represent a progression” beyond previous ones - hence the need to strengthen NDC governance and implementation structure; Reaffirm the binding obligations of developed countries under the UNFCCC to support the efforts of developing countries, while for the first time encouraging voluntary contributions by developing countries too; Extend the current goal of mobilizing $100 billion a year in support by 2020 through 2025, with a new, higher goal to be set for the period after 2025;Particularly Uganda NDCs prioritize: Renewable Energy, Clean Cooking- Which holds great mitigation potential for Uganda due to the potential offsetting of wood and charcoal burning and the consequential deforestation, climate smart agriculture, forestry and land restoration (including wetlands) and the transport sector with a focus on adaptation and resilience of local communities to climate change impacts.On energy, the NDC Uganda points to Uganda’s commitment to achieve a total of at least 3,200 MW renewable electricity generation capacity by 2030 up from 729 MW in 2013. In terms of energy demand the NDC explicitly proposes the promotion and wider uptake of energy efficient cooking stoves and induction cookers that we see contributing to approximately 40% efficiency saving over traditional cooking stoves. Similarly, for transport Uganda NDC proffers implementation of fuel efficiency policies and regulations to promote cleaner fuels and more fuel-efficient vehicle technology contributing to GHGs reduction between 24% and 34% of BAU projections for road transport.Focus now turns to implementation of these actions with the understanding that implementing the NDCs offers significant benefits, such as greater energy security and improved resilience to energy price shocks, improved health due to lower conventional pollutant emissions, and greater agricultural and land -use productivity with a clear opportunity to advance to new cleaner technologies such as wind and solar energy, low energy buildings, energy efficient industrial production, sustainable transport and climate smart agriculture.Despite all this effort, transiting and actual implementation of the commitments largely remains a challenge due to capacity gaps that exit. One of the key bottlenecks is are policy gaps related to implementation as well as an NDC implementation plan which is central to Uganda’s efforts to successfully tackle climate change. This includes designing and implementation plan as well as identifying the necessary resources available to support the actions both nationally and internationally, timelines of activities with robust outputs to facilitate the national and international reporting requirements/obligations.Against that background the Government of Uganda with support from UNDP is seeking to ensure a robust plan is in place to support implementation of the NDCs and the PA in order to achieve the ultimate goal of limiting global temperature increase well below 2 degrees.

National Consultant Risk Information Management Expert

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published May 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 19, 2017
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Uganda has witnessed several natural and human-induced disasters that have culminated into loss of life, property and displacements. The following have been prevalent: displacement, because of civil strife and natural disaster; famine as result of drought; transport accidents, earthquakes, epidemics, flooding, landslides, and environmental degradation resulting in increasing levels over risk.To reduce disaster losses and better manage disaster and climatic risks, Uganda’s Office of the Prime Minister is increasing its efforts towards disaster risk management, with a focus on hazard assessment, at-risk mapping, vulnerability assessment and risk assessment. With the support of UNDP, OPM has completed hazard, risk and vulnerability profiles and maps for all 112 districts. Building on this evidence base at the district level, OPM has commissioned the development of a national methodology to support risk-informed development at the sub-national level. At the national level, OPM seeks to consolidate the work completed to date and develop a national risk atlas.The purpose of the national risk atlas is to guide and support decision-makers, both in the public and private sectors, make evidence-based, risk-informed investment and planning decisions. It is envisaged that the atlas will be housed at the National Emergency Coordination and Operations Centre, as a dynamic tool, supported by real-time information and draw from an array of existing systems and platforms.Objectives of the Consultancy:UNDP seeks to engaging a Risk Information Management Expert to provide data, spatial analysis (risk calculation in GIS), and data and information management inputs in support of the development of the national risk atlas.

National Consultant to undertake Rapid Assessment of Uganda’s Protected Areas (PAs)

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published May 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 19, 2017
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Uganda’s Protected areas (PA) cover approximately 16.3% of the country’s total land area[1] (NEMA, 2009). They are largely divided into three major categories that include: i) National Parks, Wildlife Reserves and Community Wildlife Sanctuaries; ii) Permanent Forest Estate (Forest Reserves); and iii) Ramsar sites[2]. Wildlife Protected Areas cover 11% of Uganda’s total area and hold about 50% of the country’s wildlife. They include: 10 National Parks and 12 Wildlife Reserves, 4 Ramsar sites, 7 Wildlife Sanctuaries, 13 Community Wildlife Areas, 3 Man and Biosphere (MAB) reserves and one site on the provisional world heritage list.The Republic of Uganda has, over the years, taken concrete steps to ensure that the conservation and sustainable management of her Protected Areas. Steps taken by the Government include the adoption of the National Environment Management Policy (1994); enactment of the i) Wildlife Act (2000), ii) National Forestry and Tree Planting Act (2003) and iii) National Environment Act (2005); development of several sectoral policies such as Community Conservation Policy 2004, Wildlife Policy 2014 and the Tourism Policy 2015.Despite the existence of these laws and policies as well as supportive international agreements, unsustainable human activities still pose a big challenge to the continued survival of Uganda’s rich biodiversity. Uganda’s natural resources are declining at an alarming rate. From 1994 to 2008, forest areas declined from 25 per cent to 15 per cent and wetland cover from 15.6 to 10.9 per cent[3] largely due to unsustainable production and consumption systems, limited alternative livelihoods opportunities and human wildlife conflict. There is also a significant unmet demand for funding of conservation which underscores the need for market solutions and private sector investment in achieving resource allocation and conservation goals.To preserve the health of natural ecosystems, significantly higher volumes of capital investment are required than the amounts currently allocated for conservation. Private sector investment therefore is needed, not to replace but to complement traditional sources of conservation capital such as public funding and philanthropy, which have been negatively impacted by the global economic downturn. Conservation finance provides an opportunity to addressing the problem of gross underinvestment in this area.Following a meeting between the President of Uganda H.E Yoweri Kaguta Museveni and Ms. Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator, at the ‘Giants Summit’ (hosted by the Republic of Kenya and the NGO Space for Giants in April 2016), where UNDP reiterated its will to support the Government of Uganda on environmental matters, it was thereafter agreed that in subsequent meetings between Government, Space for Giants and UNDP there was need for Uganda to develop an investment framework to harness emerging finance for conservation, especially into protected areas management. Further, that Uganda would thereafter host the Giants Club Conservation and Tourism Investment Forum to showcase the highlighted investment opportunities in Uganda’s Conservation sector.The Government of Uganda has requested UNDP to provide technical assistance to undertake an assessment of Uganda’s Protected Areas and their conservation potential. The purpose of this assessment is to establish and report on the conservation status of protected areas as part of a wider piece of work to determine suitability for investment. This builds on a parallel request by Government to the NGO Space for Giants to assess the investment platform and opportunity. In this regard, UNDP is seeking the services of a competent consultant to undertake a rapid assessment of the conservation status of Uganda’s ‘tier 2’ Protected Areas, namely its Wildlife Reserves, Sanctuaries and Community Wildlife Areas.[1] National Environment Management Authority (NEMA), 2009[2] Protected areas designated and managed under international law of Conventions[3] National State of the Environment Report, 2012

Disaster Loss and Damage Information System National Consultant

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published November 8, 2016  -  Deadline November 18, 2016
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Disasters are, for many Ugandans, an all too common occurrence. In the last decade alone, Uganda has experienced over 2,500 disaster events, causing death, destruction and lost opportunities. Over 70 per cent of natural hazards in Uganda are related to extreme hydro-meteorological events such as droughts, floods, severe thunder and lightning storms, among others. The impact this has had on the economy has been considerable, with a reduction in GDP of 3.5 percent on average from 2010 to 2014, according to the World Bank. While over half the country is vulnerable to drought, and a third to floods, communities along the fragile dryland cattle corridor, mountainous regions and informal urban settlements are at particular risk. It is estimated that 43 per cent of Ugandans could regress into poverty during shocks.[1]Recurring small-scale and slow-onset disasters particularly affect communities, households and small and medium-sized agriculture-related enterprises, and constitute a high percentage of all losses. All countries – especially developing countries, where mortality and economic losses from natural disasters are disproportionately higher – are faced with increasing levels of hidden costs. However, until now all this goes largely unaccounted for despite its potential effects on national planning for disaster management. Moreover, even when farmers choose to take risk transfer options that make partial or complete compensation for the losses, it is mostly not reported and compensation is not commensurate with the value of the losses.The national ‘Desinventar’ database[2] used to collect and analyze damages and losses is generic and not tailored to Uganda’s context. It does not provide enough flexibility to the Government of Uganda to configure it as per emerging needs and priorities of the country.Objective of the consultancy:UNDP is seeking to recruit a Project Associate to strengthen Uganda’s disaster and damage information system. Necessary support for strengthening the national disaster loss and damage information system will be provided by UNDP, including capacity development of relevant institutions and organizations for managing disaster data. The goal is to provide useful information and analysis based on the occurrences and impacts of the past disaster events to support policy and decision-making for preparedness, mitigation, response, and risk reduction. Appropriate linkages among existing institutions will be strengthened so as to ensure that data sharing across institutions is facilitated by the disaster management information system and the database provides inputs to support sustainable development in the country.[1] Government of Uganda. Second National Development Plan (NDPII) 2015/16 – 2019/20. Kampala, 2015. Print. [2] http://www.desinventar.net/DesInventar/profiletab.jsp?countrycode=uga

National Individual Consultant Information Management and Field Assistant

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published May 8, 2017  -  Deadline May 18, 2017
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Uganda has witnessed a number of natural and human-induced disasters that have culminated into loss of life, property and displacements. The following have been prevalent, displacement, as a result of civil strife and natural disaster; famine as result of drought; transport accidents, earthquake, epidemic, flooding, landslides, environmental degradation etc.To reduce disaster losses, OPM is increasing its efforts towards disaster risk management, with a focus on hazard assessment, at-risk mapping, vulnerability assessment and risk assessment, which all have an important spatial component.The use of geospatial information from remote sensing in geographic information systems (GIS) has become an integral, well developed and successful tool in disaster risk management. New GIS techniques, in particular, are revolutionizing the potential capacity to analyze hazards, vulnerability and risks, and plan for disasters. GIS software packages are used for information storage, situation analysis and modelling.Uganda's National Emergency Coordination and Operations Centre (NECOC) is a 24 hour, 7-days a week central facility for preparedness, early warning and the coordination of emergency and crisis response and recovery action. The NECOC is established under the National Policy for Disaster Preparedness and Management (NPDPM) with the purpose of contributing towards the functionality and characteristics that make creation of an integrated and multi-sectoral system approach to planning, preparedness and management of disasters that is fundamental to sustained productivity and socio-economic growth.To further enhance NECOC’s technical capacity, an Information Management and Field Assistant is sought to support information management related activities, including remoting sensing and geographic information system (GIS) activities and undertaking field-based ‘ground truthing’ in support of risk analysis, monitoring and reporting.Objectives of the Consultancy:The Information Management and Field Assistant will support information management-related information products from remote sensing and field data, support NECOC staff in product generation, data analysis/ interpretation and reporting for early warning.

Lead Consultant for Local Economic Development for Equitable Growth in Uganda

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 7, 2017  -  Deadline August 17, 2017
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The United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) is a UN organization with a capital mandate (unique in the UN System) focused on reducing poverty and inequality first and foremost in the least developed countries (“LDC”s).??UNCDF develops and tests out financial models which mobilize and recycle domestic resources to meet local needs and which raise investor confidence in these local economies so that they can become centres of growth. UNCDF works with local governments, promoting financial and fiscal accountability to its citizens through local development funds, performance-based grant systems, structured project finance, and by strengthening local revenue streams. It also supports accountable planning, budgeting, and decision-making at the local level, recognizing the importance of having decisions about resources being made locally, and those resources being spent or invested locally.UNCDF in partnership with the Cities Alliance, the global partnership for poverty reduction and the promotion of cities in sustainable development with a representative global membership of over 30 full and associate members is implementing the Joint Work Proramme on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities in Uganda. The JWP on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities (2016-2020) focuses on supporting equitable access to public goods and services by all citizens and formal and informal businesses in cities. It works with development partners to produce global knowledge, facilitate policy dialogues and support city-level diagnostics and policy recommendations. The goal is to support growth trajectories increasingly characterised by equity, inclusion and environmental sustainability.UNCDF is specifically responsible for implementation of JWP Component 3: The Campaign Cities Initiative. The main objective is to assist two municipal governments in Uganda, the municipalities of Gulu and Mbale, to develop well-researched and evidence-based policy recommendations on how to improve the delivery of municipal public goods and service that contribute to equitable economic growth. Also, the project will facilitate UNCDF and other JWP members to support the promotion of equitable access to public goods and services in the selected Ugandan cities, based on local needs, capacities and priorities.During a 24-month local support initiative, the two Ugandan municipalities will be assisted in producing a number of outputs, such as an Institutional Enabling Environment Report, a Local Assessment Report, and city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations. Two themes were identified through a participatory and consultative process for Local Assessment Reports in Gulu and Mbale – Public Space and Land Management, and Local Economic Development. Local Assessment Reports are intended to provide detailed information about a particular public service, its scope, delivery mechanisms and recommendations about service improvements required to promote equitable economic growth. A Local Assessment Report contains a situation analysis and mapping of the city economy in terms of factors, systems and structures related to the provision of and access to public goods, resulting in a clearly documented evidence base. It is the key input to inform city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations to specify policy, legal and regulatory actions to be employed by municipal authorities to implement the LAR recommendations.Objectives of the Consultancy:Municipal governments are the primary agents for LED because they address a wide range of economic development needs and issues: business regulations and infrastructure, tax, sites and premises, waste collection, education and training. They can identify and provide leadership, and organize coalitions and partnerships within a city and region. They have the democratic mandate and responsibility, and represent the needs of the entire community.The New Urban Development Agenda (2016) stresses the need to take advantage of the opportunities of urbanization as an engine of sustained and inclusive economic growth, social and cultural development, and environmental protection, and of its potential contributions to the achievement of transformative and sustainable development. Specifically, it calls on businesses to apply their creativity and innovation toward solving sustainable development challenges in urban areas, acknowledging that private business activity, investment, and innovation are major drivers of productivity, inclusive growth and job creation and that private investment is an essential element of development efforts.Hence, UNCDF seeks to engage a Lead Consultant to prepare a Local Assessment Report on Local Economic Development in Gulu and Mbale and perform other relevant activities associated with this output. The objective of the LAR is to establish a reliable evidence base with respect to the public space and land management in the target municipalities from the perspective of public service delivery that fosters equitable economic growth.

Consultant to develop the EU-UN Spotlight Initiative Program for Uganda

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published July 20, 2018  -  Deadline July 31, 2018
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Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is one of the most widespread, persistent and devastating human rights violations in the world today. It is a major obstacle to the fulfillment of women’s and girls’ human rights and development and a threat to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.In Uganda, the prevalence of physical violence experienced by women stands at 51 per cent - far above the African average of 37.7 per cent. This violence is perpetrated in both the public and private spheres. The 2011 Uganda Demographic Health Survey (UDHS) revealed that 49 per cent of women and 41 per cent of men believe a man is justified in beating his wife in certain circumstances. the Uganda Violence Against Children Survey (2015) found that 35% of females and 17% of males between the ages of 18 to 24 have experienced sexual violence in their childhood. Substance abuse further compounds the issue, with women whose husband/partner often consume alcohol being almost 40 per cent more likely to experience spousal violence than women whose spouses do not often consume alcohol (2016 UDHS). Evidence shows that 16 per cent of women have experienced physical violence during pregnancy at some point (Kishor, 2012). In Mulago Hospital, women who experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy were 1.4 times more likely to develop obstetric complications including hypertension, premature rupture of membranes and anaemia (Kaye 2006). Physical violence against women and girls has also manifested in mental health challenges - a cross-sectional study of women (15+) in Eastern Uganda found that lifetime experience of IPV increases risks of attempted suicide.The situation has been compounded by limited access to sexual and reproductive health services, particularly contraceptive and Emergency Obstetric Care services. This has resulted into a low modern contraceptive prevalence rate at 35% and unmet need of family planning as high as 28%. Twenty-six percent of the mothers are not delivered per a skilled birth attendant and teenage pregnancy rate is also one if the highest in the region at 25%. Maternal mortality ratio at 336/100,000 live births remains unacceptably (UDHS, 2016). Relatedly, obstetric complications are common with an estimated back-log of 140,000 – 200,000 obstetric fistula cases in Country.The European Union (EU) and the United Nations have embarked on a new multi-year programme, the EU-UN Spotlight Initiative. The Spotlight Initiative aims to support transformative change on the ground to end violence against women and girls and harmful practices, in numerous countries globally. Initiative comes with the highest level of commitment globally and will be governed by the UN Deputy Secretary General and the Vice President of the EU Commission. The Initiative is built around six pillars developed after an extensive global theory of change exercise. The pillars are: 1) Laws and Policies; 2) Institutions; 3) Prevention and Social Norms; 4) Services; 5) Data; and 6) Women’s movement. Uganda is one of the participating eight countries in the Africa region and will have interventions in all the six pillars.The Uganda Spotlight team recently submitted the final Country Joint Programme Outline which was developed in full consultation with and participation by Government of Uganda, CSOs, traditional and religious leaders, private sector and other stakeholders. The Uganda is ready to start developing the full Country Joint Programme in line with the guidance and timeline provided by the Spotlight Secretariat. Given that this will be one of the largest joint programmes in Uganda, focused on transforming complex unequal power and gender relations and changing negative and harmful social norms, a full-time expert on gender based violence, is needed to coordinate, guide and lead the team to develop a technically sound and comprehensive Country Joint Programme. Objective and Scope:The purpose of the assignment is to support the development of the Spotlight Joint Programme Document for Uganda. The consultant will coordinate the planning and drafting of the Joint Programme Documents and ensure timely and quality inputs from the UN Technical Spotlight initiative team, Heads of UN Agencies, EU, Government, Civil Society Reference Group and other relevant stakeholders. The proposed Joint programme should be in alignment with UN policies, objectives and programing principles, including the overarching principle of leaving no one behind; and in overall alignment with the Spotlight Global Theory of Change and the Africa Investment Plan, ensuring the linkage between SGBV, Harmful practices and Sexual reproductive health & rights.

Lead Consultant for Urban Public Space and Land Management for Equitable Growth in Uganda

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 7, 2017  -  Deadline August 17, 2017
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The United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) is a UN organization with a capital mandate (unique in the UN System) focused on reducing poverty and inequality first and foremost in the least developed countries (“LDC”s). UNCDF develops and tests out financial models which mobilize and recycle domestic resources to meet local needs and which raise investor confidence in these local economies so that they can become centres of growth. UNCDF works with local governments, promoting financial and fiscal accountability to its citizens through local development funds, performance-based grant systems, structured project finance, and by strengthening local revenue streams. It also supports accountable planning, budgeting, and decision-making at the local level, recognizing the importance of having decisions about resources being made locally, and those resources being spent or invested locally.UNCDF in partnership with the Cities Alliance, the global partnership for poverty reduction and the promotion of cities in sustainable development with a representative global membership of over 30 full and associate members is implementing the Joint Work Proramme on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities in Uganda. The JWP on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities (2016-2020) focuses on supporting equitable access to public goods and services by all citizens and formal and informal businesses in cities. It works with development partners to produce global knowledge, facilitate policy dialogues and support city-level diagnostics and policy recommendations. The goal is to support growth trajectories increasingly characterised by equity, inclusion and environmental sustainability.UNCDF is specifically responsible for implementation of JWP Component 3: The Campaign Cities Initiative. The main objective is to assist two municipal governments in Uganda, the municipalities of Gulu and Mbale, to develop well-researched and evidence-based policy recommendations on how to improve the delivery of municipal public goods and service that contribute to equitable economic growth. Also, the project will facilitate UNCDF and other JWP members to support the promotion of equitable access to public goods and services in the selected Ugandan cities, based on local needs, capacities and priorities.During a 24-month local support initiative, the two Ugandan municipalities will be assisted in producing a number of outputs, such as an Institutional Enabling Environment Report, a Local Assessment Report, and city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations. Two themes were identified through a participatory and consultative process for Local Assessment Reports in Gulu and Mbale – Public Space and Land Management, and Local Economic Development. Local Assessment Reports are intended to provide detailed information about a particular public service, its scope, delivery mechanisms and recommendations about service improvements required to promote equitable economic growth. A Local Assessment Report contains a situation analysis and mapping of the city economy in terms of factors, systems and structures related to the provision of and access to public goods, resulting in a clearly documented evidence base. It is the key input to inform city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations to specify policy, legal and regulatory actions to be employed by municipal authorities to implement the LAR recommendations.Objectives of the Consultancy:For the process of urbanization to take place rapidly and efficiently, proper land use is critically important to ensuring that these areas drive growth in productivity and productive employment. The economic benefits of urban growth come from exploiting economies of scale; from agglomeration effects; and from effective substitution between land and non-land inputs. One of the most important pillars of an efficient city is appropriate land use, which in turn is determined by land policies and institutions that support urban efficiency. Increasing the density of economic activities is one of the key features of successful urbanization, enabled by using land for higher value activities over time.As Ugandan towns strive to foster equitable and inclusive economic growth, the challenges of ensuring proper public space and land management become more pronounced. Effective urban land management is required to promote urban regeneration and development of new industrial and commercial districts, investments to upgrade and expand critical infrastructure systems, programs to enhance and protect the environment, and initiatives to upgrade social overhead capital (housing, education, healthcare). Inadequate urban land management is a key challenge to the private sector’s engagement with developing the town by providing businesses and residents with shops, offices, factories and housing. Municipal governments, with their democratic mandate, play a triple role with respect to effective urban land management:as regulators in charge of the open space and land management framework at the local level through development plans, physical and land use plans, zoning regulations by-laws and ordinances; the regulatory function also includes enforcement of the applicable regulations;as users of land under their direct administration, including open space, directly responsible for effective use and maintenance of land and associated natural resources including land acquisition, rent or sale to third parties;as developers implementing, directly or in partnership with third parties, land development projects including changing landforms for a purpose such as housing or industrial development; subdivision of real estate into lots as well as real estate development.The New Urban Development Agenda (2016) stresses the need to take advantage of the opportunities of urbanization as an engine of sustained and inclusive economic growth, social and cultural development, and environmental protection, and of its potential contributions to the achievement of transformative and sustainable development. Specifically, it calls for the development of urban spatial frameworks that support sustainable management and use of natural resources and land, appropriate compactness and density, polycentrism, and mixed uses, through infill or planned urban extension strategies as applicable, to trigger economies of scale and agglomeration, strengthen food system planning, enhance resource efficiency, urban resilience, and environmental sustainability. The New Urban Agenda explicitly promotes safe, inclusive, accessible, green, and quality public spaces as drivers of social and economic development, sustainably leveraging their potential to generate increased social and economic value, including property value, and to facilitate business, public and private investments, and livelihood opportunities for all.Hence, UNCDF seeks to engage a Lead Consultant to prepare a Local Assessment Report on Public Space and Land Management in Gulu and Mbale and perform other relevant activities associated with this output. The objective of the LAR is to establish a reliable evidence base with respect to the public space and land management in the target municipalities from the perspective of public service delivery that fosters equitable economic growth.

Consultant for Urban Public Space and Land Management for Equitable Growth in Uganda

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published August 7, 2017  -  Deadline August 17, 2017
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The United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) is a UN organization with a capital mandate (unique in the UN System) focused on reducing poverty and inequality first and foremost in the least developed countries (“LDC”s). UNCDF develops and tests out financial models which mobilize and recycle domestic resources to meet local needs and which raise investor confidence in these local economies so that they can become centres of growth. UNCDF works with local governments, promoting financial and fiscal accountability to its citizens through local development funds, performance-based grant systems, structured project finance, and by strengthening local revenue streams. It also supports accountable planning, budgeting, and decision-making at the local level, recognizing the importance of having decisions about resources being made locally, and those resources being spent or invested locally.UNCDF in partnership with the Cities Alliance, the global partnership for poverty reduction and the promotion of cities in sustainable development with a representative global membership of over 30 full and associate members is implementing the Joint Work Proramme on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities in Uganda. The JWP on Equitable Economic Growth in Cities (2016-2020) focuses on supporting equitable access to public goods and services by all citizens and formal and informal businesses in cities. It works with development partners to produce global knowledge, facilitate policy dialogues and support city-level diagnostics and policy recommendations. The goal is to support growth trajectories increasingly characterised by equity, inclusion and environmental sustainability.UNCDF is specifically responsible for implementation of JWP Component 3: The Campaign Cities Initiative. The main objective is to assist two municipal governments in Uganda, the municipalities of Gulu and Mbale, to develop well-researched and evidence-based policy recommendations on how to improve the delivery of municipal public goods and service that contribute to equitable economic growth. Also, the project will facilitate UNCDF and other JWP members to support the promotion of equitable access to public goods and services in the selected Ugandan cities, based on local needs, capacities and priorities.During a 24-month local support initiative, the two Ugandan municipalities will be assisted in producing a number of outputs, such as an Institutional Enabling Environment Report, a Local Assessment Report, and city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations. Two themes were identified through a participatory and consultative process for Local Assessment Reports in Gulu and Mbale – Public Space and Land Management, and Local Economic Development. Local Assessment Reports are intended to provide detailed information about a particular public service, its scope, delivery mechanisms and recommendations about service improvements required to promote equitable economic growth. A Local Assessment Report contains a situation analysis and mapping of the city economy in terms of factors, systems and structures related to the provision of and access to public goods, resulting in a clearly documented evidence base. It is the key input to inform city-level evidence-based policy briefs and recommendations to specify policy, legal and regulatory actions to be employed by municipal authorities to implement the LAR recommendations.Objectives of the Consultancy:For the process of urbanization to take place rapidly and efficiently, proper land use is critically important to ensuring that these areas drive growth in productivity and productive employment. The economic benefits of urban growth come from exploiting economies of scale; from agglomeration effects; and from effective substitution between land and non-land inputs. One of the most important pillars of an efficient city is appropriate land use, which in turn is determined by land policies and institutions that support urban efficiency. Increasing the density of economic activities is one of the key features of successful urbanization, enabled by using land for higher value activities over time.As Ugandan towns strive to foster equitable and inclusive economic growth, the challenges of ensuring proper public space and land management become more pronounced. Effective urban land management is required to promote urban regeneration and development of new industrial and commercial districts, investments to upgrade and expand critical infrastructure systems, programs to enhance and protect the environment, and initiatives to upgrade social overhead capital (housing, education, healthcare). Inadequate urban land management is a key challenge to the private sector’s engagement with developing the town by providing businesses and residents with shops, offices, factories and housing. Municipal governments, with their democratic mandate, play a triple role with respect to effective urban land management:as regulators in charge of the open space and land management framework at the local level through development plans, physical and land use plans, zoning regulations by-laws and ordinances; the regulatory function also includes enforcement of the applicable regulations;as users of land under their direct administration, including open space, directly responsible for effective use and maintenance of land and associated natural resources including land acquisition, rent or sale to third parties;as developers implementing, directly or in partnership with third parties, land development projects including changing landforms for a purpose such as housing or industrial development; subdivision of real estate into lots as well as real estate development.The New Urban Development Agenda (2016) stresses the need to take advantage of the opportunities of urbanization as an engine of sustained and inclusive economic growth, social and cultural development, and environmental protection, and of its potential contributions to the achievement of transformative and sustainable development. Specifically, it calls for the development of urban spatial frameworks that support sustainable management and use of natural resources and land, appropriate compactness and density, polycentrism, and mixed uses, through infill or planned urban extension strategies as applicable, to trigger economies of scale and agglomeration, strengthen food system planning, enhance resource efficiency, urban resilience, and environmental sustainability. The New Urban Agenda explicitly promotes safe, inclusive, accessible, green, and quality public spaces as drivers of social and economic development, sustainably leveraging their potential to generate increased social and economic value, including property value, and to facilitate business, public and private investments, and livelihood opportunities for all. Hence, UNCDF seeks to engage a Consultant to prepare a Local Assessment Report on Public Space and Land Management in Gulu and Mbale and perform other relevant activities associated with this output. The objective of the LAR is to establish a reliable evidence base with respect to the public space and land management in the target municipalities from the perspective of public service delivery that fosters equitable economic growth.

EOI – Uganda - Individual Consultant for Study on the “Dynamics of the war to peace transition in Northern Uganda: economic impacts of households, communities, sectors and local bureaucracies” – EDRE – 06 2015

 | Published June 12, 2015
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REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (Individual Consultant) Study on the “Dynamics of the War to Peace Transition in Northern Uganda: Economic Impacts of Households, Communities, Sectors and Local Bureaucracies” 1. Background: The armed conflict between the Government of Uganda (GoU) and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in Northern Uganda destabilized the north in a number of ways including destroying rural households, forcing whole populations into makeshift displaced persons camps and abandoning their productive activities. Direct hostilities subsided in 2006 opening the doors for recovery. Several initiatives have since been put in place to help the affected communities transition back to normal life. An understanding of how these initiatives have helped the people to recover from the effects of the conflict is therefore important. 2. General objectives of the assignment: The goal of this study is to investigate how the households in Northern Uganda have responded to the return of peace and how this is reflected in their livelihood patterns, asset accumulation, demographic and migration patterns, and their demand for services. 3. Specific objectives of the assignment: i Participate in primary data survey in Northern Uganda ii Conduct data analysis iii Participate in producing one report addressing the proposed research questions iv Present in a workshop/conference to be organized by the research team v Co-author at least one publishable paper from the reports. 4. The call AfDB now invites eligible individual consultants to express their interest in providing these services. Interested consultants must provide information indicating that they are qualified to perform the services (description of similar assignments, experience in similar conditions etc.). 5. Eligibility The eligibility criteria, the establishment of a short list and the selection procedure shall be in conformity with the Bank’s Rules and Procedure for the Use of Consultants. Please, note that interest expressed by a Consultant does not imply any obligation on the part of the Bank to include him/her in the shortlist. The estimated duration of services is 6 months and the estimated starting date is 1st July 2015 Expressions of interest must be delivered to the address below by 18th June 2015 at 1200noon GMT+0.00. Electronic submissions by email to j.oduor@afdb.org will be accepted. Interested consultants may obtain further information at the address below during office hours (0800 to 1700 GMT+0.00, or write by email j.oduor@afdb.org Attention of Jacob Oduor Principal Research Economist, Research Department (EDRE), African Development Bank 01 BP 1387, Abidjan 01, Côte d’Ivoire Office Phone: +225 2026 1206, Email: j.oduor@afdb.org

National Consultant to Prepare the Uganda National Urban Climate Change Profile

UNDP Country Office - UGANDA | Published December 22, 2016  -  Deadline March 13, 2017
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Uganda’s population is at 34.5 million, annual population growth rate of 3.1%, making it one of the fastest growing countries in Africa, Uganda is urbanizing at a rate of 18%, the urban population growth rate is over 5% per annum, It is projected that by 2035 the total population will be 68 million with about 30% (20 million) living in urban areas. Whereas this increase is associated with socio-economic transformation of the country, it has also led to increased vulnerability of our urban areas to the effects of disasters arising from climate changeIt is important to note that Climate change is a serious challenge for cities around the world, particularly in developing countries including Uganda where urbanization is happening at neck-breaking speed. It threatens to increase vulnerabilities, destroy economic gains, and hinder social and economic development. And the urban poor will bear the brunt of its effects since they live and work in informal settlements that are more exposed to hazards. Building resilience and adapting to climate change is increasingly a high priority for cities. Besides mitigation, on which efforts have largely focused in the past, cities should today play a larger role in adaptation. Whereas UNDP and various other development institutions are working with governments world over to strengthen their capacity to assess vulnerability to climate change impacts and to identify corresponding plans and investments to increase their resilience, their efforts have been greatly affected by lack of adequate and accurate information, thus making it quite difficult for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate change adaptability measures to be put in place.In view of the above the ministry with support from UNDP intends to undertake urban climate change profiling exercise in selected towns in Uganda to create a data base for their magnitude and form of vulnerability for decision making.Objective: The overall objective of the assignment is to carry out climate change profiling for selected urban centers in Uganda.

International Consultant for Terminal Evaluation for Low Emission Capacity Building Project

Uganda Country Office - UGANDA | Published March 30, 2017  -  Deadline April 12, 2017
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Capacity development is essential and central to countries’ efforts to successfully tackle climate change. This includes increasing institutional capacities to provide appropriate skills and mechanisms of support and coordination when addressing climate change risks. It includes strengthening technical knowledge to better understand and make use of climate information, and increasing relevant data and access to data for planning and informed decision making.This EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Programme aimed at strengthening the technical and institutional capacity of Uganda in climate change mitigation actions that promote low emission (carbon) development in line with the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol frameworks while at the same time promoting socio-economic development. This action is primarily for enhancing the national capacity for establishing GHG emission inventory and MRV systems, and for developing NAMAs and LEDS. The Project further targeted enhancement of the national capacities and raising general knowledge and awareness on climate change, and provide support to the development of the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs). It also aimed at contributing to putting climate change issues higher on the national agenda through strengthened cooperation and increased involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the process, and strengthening and building national capacities for participation in different mechanisms related to low emission development and fulfilling other commitments to the UNFCCC.Project SummaryThe project was envisaged to achieved 3 major outcomes including:Robust national systems for preparation of GHG emission inventories have been established at a national level;NAMAs and LEDS have been formulated within the context of national development priorities;MRV systems have been created to support implementation and evaluation of NAMAs and LEDS.At mid-term, a review was carried out at global level to assess the implementation of the project as well as the extent to which it had achieved its intended objectives and results, and generating lessons learnt to guide the implementation of the remaining activities of Project. The Terminal Evaluation (TE) will be conducted per the guidance, rules and procedures established by UNDP as reflected in the ‘UNDP Guidance for Conducting Terminal Evaluations of UNDP-supported.The main objective of the evaluation is to assess project implementation, including how the design of the project has impacted on implementation, results, relevancy, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability, unexpected effects, and lessons.Objectives of the Evaluation:The subject of the evaluation is the project outcomes and outputs as well as the project processes by highlighting the results, challenges faced, lessons learnt, recommendations, and the impact on the targeted beneficiaries. The evaluation coverage will include the logic and underlying assumptions upon which the strategy was originally developed, and the implementation strategy that has been adopted.The evaluation shall assess the extent of achievement of the intended long term results defined in the PRODOC, and identify opportunities, challenges and lessons learnt during implementation, and determine relevance of a next phase of programming. In addition, the evaluation shall:identify the impact of project activities on the target beneficiaries, particularly regarding capacity for GHG emissions management and local economic development;Identify the changes in the policy/regulatory environment and the effects they have on capacity for GHG emissions management in Uganda;Identify results of the project that should be scaled up into the rest of the country.The findings from this evaluation will be used where necessary to improve on design, implementation and management of future projects and interventions.